2019
DOI: 10.1002/jemt.23394
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Age‐related ultrastructural features of the tongue of the rock pigeon Columba livia dakhlae in different three age stages (young, mature, and adult) captured from Egypt

Abstract: This study represents the first attempt to describe the ultra‐structural and histological features of different three age‐stages (young, mature, and adult) of rock pigeon Columba livia dakhlae captured from Egypt. The elongated tongue with round lingual apex carried a lingual nail rostrally on lingual tip. The current work gave a first record of numerous descriptions as in young and mature, small lingual nail formed from aggregation of lingual scales, but in adult, the nail formed from lingual membrane without… Show more

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Cited by 20 publications
(61 citation statements)
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“…Under the lingual epithelium, the submucosa mainly formed of highly vascularised fibro‐elastic connective tissue and longitudinally oriented lingual skeletal muscles that may enable the voluntary control of lingual protrusion and movement of the food particles within the oropharynx and during swallowing too. The entoglossum extended rostrally throughout the submucosa of the tongue except for the apical part of the tongue like most avian species (Abumandour & Kandyel, 2020; Samar et al., 1995), while in some species like European kestrel and Hume's tawny owl, it was extended from the tip till the root of the tongue and it was supported by skeletal muscles (Abumandour & El‐Bakary, 2017b). The entoglossum appeared as hyaline cartilage surrounded by connective tissue capsule and invaded by blood vessels that referred to signs of ossification while in hoopoe was cartilaginous in the apex and ossified towards the root of the tongue (Abumandour & Gewaily, 2019b; Jackowiak et al., 2006).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Under the lingual epithelium, the submucosa mainly formed of highly vascularised fibro‐elastic connective tissue and longitudinally oriented lingual skeletal muscles that may enable the voluntary control of lingual protrusion and movement of the food particles within the oropharynx and during swallowing too. The entoglossum extended rostrally throughout the submucosa of the tongue except for the apical part of the tongue like most avian species (Abumandour & Kandyel, 2020; Samar et al., 1995), while in some species like European kestrel and Hume's tawny owl, it was extended from the tip till the root of the tongue and it was supported by skeletal muscles (Abumandour & El‐Bakary, 2017b). The entoglossum appeared as hyaline cartilage surrounded by connective tissue capsule and invaded by blood vessels that referred to signs of ossification while in hoopoe was cartilaginous in the apex and ossified towards the root of the tongue (Abumandour & Gewaily, 2019b; Jackowiak et al., 2006).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Generally, the lingual Salivary glands are well developed in the granivorous avian species, ill‐developed in the predatory avian species, but they are poorly developed in the piscivores avian species or even absent as in stork (Abumandour & Kandyel, 2020; Hanna Jackowiak et al., 2015; Tütüncü, Onuk, & Kabak, 2012) and the cormorant bird (Jackowiak et al., 2006). The glandular tissues that had been demonstrated in the current study could be classified into three types: lingual, sublingual and palatine glands.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…The most of the functional processes inside the oral cavity are carried out by the tongue, whose presence and description have been showed in different species of fish, demonstrating the variation in the presence of anatomical structures like taste buds, mucous cells and teeth in teleosts, also of commercial interest (Abbate et al., 2006,2017,2020a,2020b; Abbate, Guerrera, Montalbano, Ciriaco, et al., 2012; Abbate, Guerrera, Montalbano, De Carlos, et al., 2012; Alsafy, Bassuoni, & Hanafy, 2018; Amato et al., 2012; Dos Santos, Arantes, Santiago, & Dos Santos, 2015; El Bakary, 2014; Elgendy, Alsafy, & Tanekhy, 2016; Germanà et al., 2009; Guerrera et al., 2015; Ikpegbu, Ibe, & Nlebedum, 2019; Kasumyan, 2019; Kettratad, Senarat, Boonyoung, & Jiraungkoorsku, 2017; Levanti et al., 2017; Mahmoud, Essa, & Sayed, 2016; Sadeghinezhad, Rahmati‐holasoo, Fayyaz, & Zargar, 2015; Sayed, Mahmoud, & Essa, 2019; Yu et al., 2019). Several significant papers, important as comparative data, are present in the literature in upper vertebrates like birds, reptiles and mammals (Abbate et al, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2020b; Abumandour & Kandyel, 2020; Barbosa et al., 2020; Bels et al., 2020; Cizek, Hamouzova, Goździewska‐Harłajczuk, Klećkowska‐Nawrot, & Kvapil, 2020; Cizek, Hamouzova, Kvapil, & Kyllar, 2019; Emura, 2016a,2016b,2016c,2017,2018a,2018b,2018c,2018d,2019; Erdoğan & Alan, 2012; Erdoğan & Iwasaki, 2014; Erdoğan Lima & Pérez, 2016; Erdoğan Villar Arias & Pérez, 2016; Erdoğan, Villar Arias, et al., 2016; Erdoğan et al., 2018a; Erdoğan and Sağsöz, 2018b; Freire et al., 2019; Gonçalves et al., …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%