2016
DOI: 10.1596/978-1-4648-0884-5
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Minds and Behaviors at Work: Boosting Socioemotional Skills for Latin America’s Workforce

Abstract: This work is a product of the staff of The World Bank with external contributions. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this work do not necessarily reflect the views of The World Bank, its Board of Executive Directors, or the governments they represent. The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any judgment on the part of The World Bank concerni… Show more

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Cited by 33 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…Hence, they do not allow for drawing implications for the evolution of wage inequality. The relationship of noncognitive skills (measured in the three Latin American countries) and wages is not as strong as the association between cognitive reading skills and earnings (Cunningham, Acosta, and Muller 2016). Cognitive skills are strongly associated with education, but they explain a smaller share of the variance of wages .…”
mentioning
confidence: 72%
“…Hence, they do not allow for drawing implications for the evolution of wage inequality. The relationship of noncognitive skills (measured in the three Latin American countries) and wages is not as strong as the association between cognitive reading skills and earnings (Cunningham, Acosta, and Muller 2016). Cognitive skills are strongly associated with education, but they explain a smaller share of the variance of wages .…”
mentioning
confidence: 72%
“…Employers around the world also value socioemotional skills, such as the ability to communicate, to work in a group, punctuality, and responsibility (Cunningham and Villaseñor, 2016;Bassi et al, 2012). Good socioemotional skills allow workers to make the most of their cognitive skills and transform those cognitive skills into valuable output for their employers (Cunningham, Acosta, and Muller, 2016). A great advantage of STEP is that, in addition to measures of cognitive abilities, it includes information on personality traits and socioemotional skills, including indicators of the degree of extraversion, conscientiousness, openness to experience, emotional stability, agreeableness, grit, and decision-making.…”
Section: The Rest Of the Storymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…25 Poor youth with low levels of education and experience-high school at mostwho are unemployed or underemployed. 26 Using data from employer surveys, Cunningham, Acosta, and Muller (2016) investigate the role of cognitive and socioemotional skills in shaping adults' labor market outcomes in Bolivia, Colombia, El Salvador, and Peru. They confirm that cognitive skills matter for earning better wages and improving the probability of having a formal job; but so do socioemotional skills.…”
Section: Youth Training Programs: Help Getting Startedmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Like other socio-emotional skills, personality traits are in part developed by socializing and learning, and they have beneficial effects on individual education, work, and life success [for an overview, see e.g., Almlund et al ( 2011 ), Brunello and Schlotter ( 2011 )] as well as on societal outcomes (OECD, 2019 ). Personality traits can be conceived of as skills because they complement knowledge and transform cognitive skills into output (Cunningham et al, 2016 , p. 7).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%