2012
DOI: 10.1001/2013.jamainternmed.77
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Mexico–United States Migration and the Prevalence of Obesity: A Transnational Perspective

Abstract: However, neither therapy was provided in 15.4 million visits, accounting for 36% of visits and not varying significantly over time (P= .76). Comment.In this nationally representative sample of adult ambulatory visits, visits involving a substance use disorder increased substantially between 2001 and 2009. Opioid use disorders accounted for a markedly increased share of visits over time. This finding is consistent with trends in substance use disorder-related utilization at the nation's community health centers… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…The prevalence of obesity and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases have been reported in both American Indians and Mexican Americans [13, 5, 8]. Studies suggest that when compared to other race/ethnic groups, American Indians have one of the highest rates of cardiovascular disease and the highest prevalence of stroke in noninstitutionalized adults [5254].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The prevalence of obesity and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases have been reported in both American Indians and Mexican Americans [13, 5, 8]. Studies suggest that when compared to other race/ethnic groups, American Indians have one of the highest rates of cardiovascular disease and the highest prevalence of stroke in noninstitutionalized adults [5254].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This increase in the incidence of obesity in American Indians may be due in part to the relative abundance of high fat, high calorie food, and a shift from an active to a more sedentary lifestyle [2]. There is also evidence of greater odds of obesity among US-born Mexican Americans, in comparison to first generation Mexican Americans [5]. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2002) reported a 40% prevalence of overweight in Mexican-origin children between the ages of 6 and 19 (versus 28% for non-Hispanic whites) [6].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Among daily smokers, US-born Mexicans smoked more cigarettes per day than did Mexicans who had a migrant in their family and Mexican men with migration experience. Flórez et al (47) found a similar relationship with obesity, such that respondents living in Mexico who had a family member in the United States were more likely to be obese compared with those who had no migrants in their family; however, this relationship was only significant among men.…”
Section: Promising New Directions In Acculturation Researchmentioning
confidence: 91%
“…Yet public health research using a transnational perspective is still in its infancy (3, 83, 109, 116), and large quantitative sources for this type of study are rare (3, 47, 83, 109, 111, 116). Furthermore, research using this approach would benefit from focusing on Latino groups (other than Mexicans) with important circular patterns of migration (e.g., the “air bridge” between New York City and the Dominican Republic).…”
Section: Promising New Directions In Acculturation Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In middle income countries, like Mexico, rates of being overweight or obese are the highest in more developed regions and among the poor [8,9]; these groups may be especially prone to migration. In developed countries, like the United States, the prevalence is the greatest among low-income people as well as minority and migrant populations [10]. Among migrants, the high prevalence of being overweight or obese is best explained by sudden changes in diet, in both the preparation and consumption of food, changes that expose migrants to what some describe as an "accelerated nutritional transition" [11].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%