2017
DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v40i0.37677
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. The environment is very important for the performance of laying hens; thus, techniques are required to improve production systems, providing better welfare for poultry and consequent increase in the quality of the final product, the egg. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of rearing system, on the floor and in cage, on the performance and egg internal and external quality of laying hens. A total of 320 Hysex Brown laying hens, with 34-43 weeks days of age, was distributed in a completely random… Show more

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Cited by 2 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…In general, greater shell thickness was observed in the region with the highest shell weight. Winter-time values of shell weight and thickness were higher than those described by Netto et al [42], Sahin et al [12], Torki et al [13], and Yan et al [43] and close to those obtained by Samiullah et al [7] in thermoneutral environmental conditions. The measured shell thickness values corroborate those obtained by Karami et al [11], Sahin et al [12], and Torki et al [13], measured in environments with elevated temperatures (32 • C and 34 • C).…”
Section: Temperature (supporting
confidence: 82%
“…In general, greater shell thickness was observed in the region with the highest shell weight. Winter-time values of shell weight and thickness were higher than those described by Netto et al [42], Sahin et al [12], Torki et al [13], and Yan et al [43] and close to those obtained by Samiullah et al [7] in thermoneutral environmental conditions. The measured shell thickness values corroborate those obtained by Karami et al [11], Sahin et al [12], and Torki et al [13], measured in environments with elevated temperatures (32 • C and 34 • C).…”
Section: Temperature (supporting
confidence: 82%