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Cited by 31 publications
(8 citation statements)
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References 35 publications
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“…While more severe forms of poverty are to a greater extent found among social renters than are less severe forms, it is well documented that private renters are an increasing share of those in headline income poverty (Cribb, Norris Keiller and Waters, 2018). 43 We now investigate whether this is true for more severe forms of poverty.…”
Section: Housing Tenurementioning
confidence: 96%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…While more severe forms of poverty are to a greater extent found among social renters than are less severe forms, it is well documented that private renters are an increasing share of those in headline income poverty (Cribb, Norris Keiller and Waters, 2018). 43 We now investigate whether this is true for more severe forms of poverty.…”
Section: Housing Tenurementioning
confidence: 96%
“…From 2015-16 to 2016-17, mean income fell slightly. As we noted in last year's report (Cribb, Norris Keiller and Waters, 2018), due to increases in dividend taxation in April 2016, this may have been driven by individuals shifting their dividend income forward from 2016-17 to 2015-16; thus one should be wary about drawing any conclusions regarding changes in mean income over those years.…”
Section: Figure 22 Average Real Uk Household Income (Measured Bhc)mentioning
confidence: 98%
“…15 It is also of note that, on average, pensioners may no longer be the poorest members of society. 16 Changes to pensions, however, would be politically divisive and may have limited financial impact on health system funding.…”
Section: Reallocation Of Fundsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, in-work poverty is a growing issue, accounting for around two-thirds of all child poverty (Hick and Lanau, 2018;JRF, 2018). The introduction of the 'National Living Wage' for over twenty-five year olds in 2016 has increased the hourly pay of low earners, but family incomes also depend on working hours, pay progression, how many in the household are working, and the impact of reductions in in-work benefits (Bangham, 2017;Cribb et al, 2018;Swaffield et al, 2018). Furthermore, labour market insecurity is being fed by an increase in 'non-standard' workself-employment, temporary, agency and zero hours contract workingassociated with part time, irregular hours, short term jobs, lower earnings and 'one-sided flexibility' (CAB, 2016;Caraher and Reuter, 2017;Judge, 2018;Low Pay Commission, 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The strain on low income families can also be compounded by rising living costs, particularly for housing. High property prices and insufficient social housing have pushed a growing proportion of families into the more expensive private rented sector (Cribb et al, 2018;JRF, 2018) where over 40 per cent of households with children are living in poverty after rent is paid (NHF, 2019). Increasingly, Housing Benefit and its equivalent in Universal Credit do not cover rent, leaving tenants to make up the shortfall (JRF, 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%