2005
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032005000100018
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Abstract: Lizards rarely visit and pollinate flowers, the few recent records being mostly restricted to island habitats. We report here on the Noronha skink (Euprepis atlanticus) seeking nectar in the flowers of the leguminous mulungu tree (Erythrina velutina) at Fernando de Noronha Archipelago, off northeast Brazil. The mulungu tree blooms during the dry season, and each flower secretes copious and diluted nectar throughout the day. The Noronha skink climbs up to the inflorescences and laps the nectar accumulated in th… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(19 citation statements)
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References 14 publications
(27 reference statements)
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“…Copious amounts of diluted nectar are reported for several passerinepollinated Erythrina species (e.g. Toledo and Hernández 1979;Rangaiah et al 2004;Etcheverry and Alemán 2005), a trait that contrasts with much smaller amounts of more concentrated nectar found in hummingbird-pollinated species within the genus, such as E. speciosa Andr., with sugar composition~35% and 15 mL of nectar per flower (Buzato et al 2000;Sazima et al 2005). The slightly higher nectar concentration we recorded for E. velutina at the end of the day is likely to be due to water evaporation, as temperature increases and relative humidity decreases throughout the day (see Rangaiah et al 2004 for similar results in E. variegata L.).…”
Section: Floral Biologysupporting
confidence: 48%
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“…Copious amounts of diluted nectar are reported for several passerinepollinated Erythrina species (e.g. Toledo and Hernández 1979;Rangaiah et al 2004;Etcheverry and Alemán 2005), a trait that contrasts with much smaller amounts of more concentrated nectar found in hummingbird-pollinated species within the genus, such as E. speciosa Andr., with sugar composition~35% and 15 mL of nectar per flower (Buzato et al 2000;Sazima et al 2005). The slightly higher nectar concentration we recorded for E. velutina at the end of the day is likely to be due to water evaporation, as temperature increases and relative humidity decreases throughout the day (see Rangaiah et al 2004 for similar results in E. variegata L.).…”
Section: Floral Biologysupporting
confidence: 48%
“…Thus, we suggest that visits of Noronha Island native vertebrates to E. velutina flowers are likely to serve a dual purpose, i.e. water balance and energy acquisition (see Sazima et al 2005 for this view about the lizard visitor). This dual purpose is already reported for Erythrina species in mainland Central and South America (Toledo and Hernández 1979;Etcheverry and Alemán 2005) and India (Rangaiah et al 2004).…”
Section: Visitors and Their Behaviour On Flowersmentioning
confidence: 89%
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“…Eifler 1995;Valido 2003, 2004;Sazima et al 2005). At the oceanic island of Fernando de Noronha, north-eastern Brazil, we found that flowers of E. velutina are visited by a small assemblage of native vertebrates (three of them endemics, see Sick 1997;Carleton and Olson 1999).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 73%