2019
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-17385-2_5
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Life Cycle and Life History Strategies of Parasitic Crustacea

Abstract: Different parasitic life strategies are described including four new life cycles: complex rebrooding, micro-male, mesoparasite and prey-predator transfer. Four new life cycle behaviours are named: nursery hiding, mid-moult stage, positive precursor (intraspecific antagonism) and negative precursor (ambush strategy). Further strategies discussed are opossum attack, double parasitism (doubling of the normal reproductive set), duplex arrangement (separated male-female pairs), simple rebrooding, and describing how… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

0
14
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
7

Relationship

1
6

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 26 publications
(14 citation statements)
references
References 172 publications
0
14
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Isopoda (woodlice and their relatives) is an enormously diverse group of malacostracan crustaceans. Having a marine origin, isopod species did not only master the transition to a fully terrestrial life (Oniscidea), they also inhabit deep sea and freshwater environments, and some groups even developed parasitic lifestyles (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019). Some isopod species have been known as parasites of fishes and crustaceans for a long time (e.g., Müller, 1862).…”
Section: Introduction General Backgroundmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Isopoda (woodlice and their relatives) is an enormously diverse group of malacostracan crustaceans. Having a marine origin, isopod species did not only master the transition to a fully terrestrial life (Oniscidea), they also inhabit deep sea and freshwater environments, and some groups even developed parasitic lifestyles (Williams and Bunkley-Williams, 2019). Some isopod species have been known as parasites of fishes and crustaceans for a long time (e.g., Müller, 1862).…”
Section: Introduction General Backgroundmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In this case, neither specimen in Alacranes Reef appeared to be attached to the tongue or feeding on the lionfish host. Williams & Bunkley-Williams (in press) described juvenile prey-predator transfers as a new life cycle strategy in Cymothoa oestrum . This latter transfer was previously documented in adult Anilocra acuta to King Mackerel Scomberomorus cavalla (Williams & Bunkley-Williams, 1994).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although both were collected from the backwater bay where many N. beckfordi are parasitized by A. minima, the lack of parasitism in Nannostomus eques Steindachner, 1876 and Nannostomus trifasciatus Steindachner, 1876 may be a result of their differential habitat use (spatial use of the water column) or because they were found in lower abundances in habitat 5 throughout the year (Table S2). Cymothoid mancae have been described as phototropic in the marine environment (Williams & Bunkley‐Williams, 2019), but freshwater cymothoid mancae present alternative strategies including waiting upside‐down on the substrate (Thatcher, 2000). Movement of N. eques is restricted to vegetation near the surface and therefore may not be subjected to settlement of parasite mancae at lower depths.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Males develop female gonads after successful infestation of a host but only when it is unoccupied by another female. Suppression of sex-change of newly arrived males by preexisting females is regulated by a complex process of chemical cues (Williams & Bunkley-Williams, 2019). Cymothoids typically exhibit low infestation rates, with a single adult pair parasitizing the same host individual, and, possibly because they compete for the same host resource, there is strong sexual dimorphism with large, embryo-and larvae-incubating, females, and smaller males (Thatcher, 2000;Williams & Bunkley- Williams, 2019).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation