2022
DOI: 10.5871/jba/010s4.001
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�Languages don�t have bones, so you can just break them�: rethinking multilingualism in education policy and practice in Africa

Abstract: Multilingualism is widespread amongst individuals and communities in African countries. However, language-in-education policies across the continent continue to privilege monolingual approaches to language use in the classroom. In this paper we highlight the colonial origins of these monolingual ideologies and discuss the detrimental effects which arise when learners� linguistic repertoires are not welcomed within the education system. We draw attention to major themes within education across a range of contex… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 38 publications
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“…The dominance of English in South Africa is a consequence of colonialism and a symptom of global capitalism. In a field‐defining collection (Gibson & Reilly, 2022) on African multilingualism throughout the Continent, we find that some 40% of the global population do not have access to education in a language they speak or understand. Yet all contributors to the distinguished volume agree that the mother tongue in early years education is the best foundation.…”
Section: International Perspectives On English Language and Literaturementioning
confidence: 91%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The dominance of English in South Africa is a consequence of colonialism and a symptom of global capitalism. In a field‐defining collection (Gibson & Reilly, 2022) on African multilingualism throughout the Continent, we find that some 40% of the global population do not have access to education in a language they speak or understand. Yet all contributors to the distinguished volume agree that the mother tongue in early years education is the best foundation.…”
Section: International Perspectives On English Language and Literaturementioning
confidence: 91%
“…In a field-defining collection (Gibson & Reilly, 2022) on African multilingualism throughout the Continent, we find that some 40% of the global population do not have access to education in a language they speak or understand.…”
mentioning
confidence: 95%