2015
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0143049
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ITS and trnH-psbA as Efficient DNA Barcodes to Identify Threatened Commercial Woody Angiosperms from Southern Brazilian Atlantic Rainforests

Abstract: The Araucaria Forests in southern Brazil are part of the Atlantic Rainforest, a key hotspot for global biodiversity. This habitat has experienced extensive losses of vegetation cover due to commercial logging and the intense use of wood resources for construction and furniture manufacturing. The absence of precise taxonomic tools for identifying Araucaria Forest tree species motivated us to test the ability of DNA barcoding to distinguish species exploited for wood resources and its suitability for use as an a… Show more

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Cited by 69 publications
(54 citation statements)
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“…Nithaniyal et al () used the standard plant DNA barcode markers to accurately identify wood samples collected at timber processing plants in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. This same success was demonstrated in timber species found in Araucaria rain forests of the southern Atlantic coast of Brazil (Bolson et al, ), which contains many threatened species of trees with high commercial importance, especially in the family Lauraceae. Most recently, DNA barcoding was employed to monitor illegal timber trade in the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, where species of Dalbergia (Fabaceae), the rosewoods, are under threat.…”
Section: Hotspots In the Application Of Plant Dna Barcodes Todaysupporting
confidence: 63%
“…Nithaniyal et al () used the standard plant DNA barcode markers to accurately identify wood samples collected at timber processing plants in Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. This same success was demonstrated in timber species found in Araucaria rain forests of the southern Atlantic coast of Brazil (Bolson et al, ), which contains many threatened species of trees with high commercial importance, especially in the family Lauraceae. Most recently, DNA barcoding was employed to monitor illegal timber trade in the biodiversity hotspot of Madagascar, where species of Dalbergia (Fabaceae), the rosewoods, are under threat.…”
Section: Hotspots In the Application Of Plant Dna Barcodes Todaysupporting
confidence: 63%
“…Numerous studies have suggested that four standard barcodes, mat K, rbc L, trn H- psb A, and ITS , should be used as core barcode markers for the molecular identification of land plants (Hollingsworth et al, 2011; Li et al, 2011). In addition to choosing DNA barcoding fragments, collecting many individuals from different populations within a species is also important for establishing a reference database for universal application (Bolson et al, 2015; Guo et al, 2016). …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…After running the metaResultExtractor.pl script to scan for gen- again, they should be interpreted cautiously until identification of such organisms can be confirmed with a combinatory standardized method (e.g., qPCR) or additional genetic markers due to the limited resolution power of the ITS1 for certain groups (Inderbitzin et al, 2011;Inderbitzin & Subbarao, 2014;Martin et al, 2012;Peever et al, 2004;Taheri, Chatterton, Foroud, Gossen, & McLaren, 2017;Zitnick-Anderson et al, 2018). For instance, the elongation factor 1α is better suited for identification of F. sporotrichioides (Taheri et al, 2017;Zitnick-Anderson et al, 2018), and the trnH-psbA spacer is gaining in popularity for assisting plant identification (Bolson, Smidt, Brotto, & Silva-Pereira, 2015;Kress & Erickson, 2007).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%