2020
DOI: 10.1186/s12939-020-1149-1
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Indigenous engagement in health: lessons from Brazil, Chile, Australia and New Zealand

Abstract: Background: Given the persistence of Indigenous health inequities across national contexts, many countries have adopted strategies to improve the health of Indigenous peoples. Governmental recognition of the unique health needs of Indigenous populations is necessary for the development of targeted programs and policies to achieve universal health coverage. At the same time, the participation of Indigenous peoples in decision-making and program and policy design helps to ensure that barriers to health services … Show more

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Cited by 22 publications
(11 citation statements)
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“…Although there are complex social and political factors at play that impact on education and employment opportunities, adequate housing, and access to health services, this inequality is also partly attributed to the inability of existing oral health and other health services to meet the cultural needs of Indigenous communities [7]. Barriers to participation in health care services also stem from the profound and intergenerational effects of colonisation, which has resulted in many Indigenous peoples having an entrenched mistrust, from having endured poor treatment and racism over many years [8,9]. It has been recognised that more culturally appropriate child oral health promotion programs are needed [10].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Although there are complex social and political factors at play that impact on education and employment opportunities, adequate housing, and access to health services, this inequality is also partly attributed to the inability of existing oral health and other health services to meet the cultural needs of Indigenous communities [7]. Barriers to participation in health care services also stem from the profound and intergenerational effects of colonisation, which has resulted in many Indigenous peoples having an entrenched mistrust, from having endured poor treatment and racism over many years [8,9]. It has been recognised that more culturally appropriate child oral health promotion programs are needed [10].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…International literature on health inequities suggests the key to successful outcomes is held within communities who have taken control over their health, health services and systems [12,36]. Indigenous participation, engagement in health programming, policy development [37], structural transformation [38], and culturally appropriate healthcare, recognized as a political right [35] are specific tenets within those discourses of control.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“… 15 The health gap is persistent between Māori and non-Māori. 16 Chronic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are more prevalent among Māori compared with other New Zealanders. 17 18 Māori have a higher need for renal replacement therapy 15 and a 30% higher risk of developing a cardiovascular event compared with European New Zealanders.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“… 17 18 Māori have a higher need for renal replacement therapy 15 and a 30% higher risk of developing a cardiovascular event compared with European New Zealanders. 19 15 16 17 18 15 …”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%