2008
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-282x2008000600010
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Inattention, hyperactivity, oppositional-defiant symptoms and school failure

Abstract: -Background: Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with school failure. Inattention has been mainly implicated for this association. Oppositional-defiant disorder's (ODD) impact on academic performance remains controversial, because of the high comorbidity between ODD and ADHD. Objective: To understand the role of inattention (IN), hyperactivity (H/I) and ODD in school failure. Method: Parents and teachers filled out SNAP-IV questionnaires for 241 / 6 th grade students. The associations… Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(11 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(24 reference statements)
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“…Descritores: Transtorno de déficit de atenção com hiperatividade, resiliência, adolescentes. another non-clinical sample with low socioeconomic status 5 we found that inattention was associated with school failure, whereas hyperactivity-impulsivity (H/I) symptoms were not when controlled for inattention.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 70%
“…Descritores: Transtorno de déficit de atenção com hiperatividade, resiliência, adolescentes. another non-clinical sample with low socioeconomic status 5 we found that inattention was associated with school failure, whereas hyperactivity-impulsivity (H/I) symptoms were not when controlled for inattention.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 70%
“…DBPs in parents have been linked to the abuse of their offspring, thereby increasing their risk of developing CD[ 84 , 85 ]. Children presenting with hyperactivity-inattention behaviours are more likely to have a more favourable educational outcome compared with those with aggression or oppositional behaviours[ 86 , 87 ].…”
Section: Complications Of Childhood Behavioural and Emotional Disordementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Each item has four response options: ‘not at all’, ‘just a little’, ‘quite a bit’, and ‘very much’. As the diagnosis of ADHD should be made by a physician after gathering a detailed patient history, the same criterion employed in previous studies was used in this investigation. Children whose parents/caregivers and/or teachers responded ‘quite a bit’ or ‘very much’ to at least six items on each subscale were considered to have signs of attention deficit and/or hyperactivity.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%