2009
DOI: 10.1186/2047-783x-14-9-378
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Abstract: BackgroundIn IRCU it is uncertain whether variation of urinary protein, especially non-albumin protein (NAlb-P), is due to the presence of stones or reflects alteration of oxidative metabolism.AimsTo validate in a tripartite cross-sectional study of 187 ambulatory male patients, undergoing a standardized laboratory programme, whether stones impact on N-Alb-P or the state of oxidative metabolism interferes with IRCU pathophysiology.MethodsIn part 1 the strata low and high of fasting urinary excretion rate per 2… Show more

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Cited by 3 publications
(7 citation statements)
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References 64 publications
(92 reference statements)
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“…The association between NAFLD and renal stone disease has received little attention. In the review of recent literature, oxidative and systemic metabolisms are compatible with stone formation [16] . The kidneys is an highly vulnerable organ damaged by reactive oxygen species, likely due to the abundance of long chain poly unsaturated fatty acids in the composition of renal lipids and systemic oxidative species can result in peroxidation of lipid that may have an effect in calcium oxalate stone formation [16] .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…The association between NAFLD and renal stone disease has received little attention. In the review of recent literature, oxidative and systemic metabolisms are compatible with stone formation [16] . The kidneys is an highly vulnerable organ damaged by reactive oxygen species, likely due to the abundance of long chain poly unsaturated fatty acids in the composition of renal lipids and systemic oxidative species can result in peroxidation of lipid that may have an effect in calcium oxalate stone formation [16] .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In the review of recent literature, oxidative and systemic metabolisms are compatible with stone formation [16] . The kidneys is an highly vulnerable organ damaged by reactive oxygen species, likely due to the abundance of long chain poly unsaturated fatty acids in the composition of renal lipids and systemic oxidative species can result in peroxidation of lipid that may have an effect in calcium oxalate stone formation [16] . Further data suggest that fatty liver may result in changes in urinary constituents, leading to an increased incidence of stone formation [17] .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The overlap of patients in present and previous work, following substantially different strategies [ 19 , 20 ], was about 95%. The study was retrospective, observational, cross-sectional and correlative (healthy control individuals were not included).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 41%
“…The following uncontrolled study is an extension of, and to some degree summarizing, our previous reports in this area [11,16-20]. The focus was on several questions: 1) are the levels of bio markers (see below) different, depending on whether SF or SB patients are studied; if not, in which other regards arc these subsets of patients different; 2) are traditional Ca stone risk parameters subject to modulation by variation of bio markers; 3) which factors influence the frequency distribution of SF and SB patients; 4) study of interrelationships of variables and, if helpful in understanding events involved in formation of new Ca stone, to comment a possible initiating role of OM.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Hyperuricemia is a frequent finding among NAFLD patients, and it is well-known that insulin resistance may decrease urinary ammonia synthesis and excretion, resulting in lower urinary pH and creating favorable conditions for the formation of uric acid stones [213,214]. Furthermore, idiopathic calcium urolithiasis seems to be induced by altered oxidative stress, increasing renal non-albumin protein excretion and reducing urinary ammonia, resulting in higher hydroxyapatite crystallization and stone formation [215]. As touched on previously, NAFLD and MetS are characterized by persistent, low-grade inflammation and the resulting oxidative stress may damage the kidney parenchyma through lipid peroxidation of long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids, increasing the risk of calcium oxalate stone formation [216].…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%