1984
DOI: 10.1016/0161-5890(84)90113-5 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Abstract-This paper presents a dual-recognition model of the T-cell receptor that has been constructed to account for the phenomenon of MHC restriction as well as the paradoxical ability of T-cells to be both multispecific and precisely specific at the same time. In our model the combining sites for antigen and MHC are not independent as in classical dual-recognition models. but interact with each other by an allosteric mechanism. We envision a flexible receptor with combining sites for antigen and MHC that ar… Show more

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“…The other is a low-affinity (or normally inaccessible) MHC-binding site which is induced to increase its affinity for (or is exposed to bind) polymorphic class II determinants only after the binding site for foreign antigen has been engaged. This model is consistent with recent reports (10-11) that the T cell receptor may bind nominal antigen in the absence of MHC molecules, and is compatible with allosteric models (12,13) of T cell receptor function that involve cooperativity between the nominal antigen and the MHC binding sites. Our experiments do not distinguish between a single a-,0 chain complex that contains both binding sites and the possibility that a second T cell surface receptor binds self MHC .…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
“…Antigens. hFPB (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7)(8)(9)(10)(11)(12)(13)(14) was obtained from Bachem (Torrance, CA). HEL (whole protein, Sigma Grade I) was purchased from Sigma (St. Louis, MO).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
“…This "dual-recognition" process has multiple implications for the development and functions of the immune system and has thus been the focus of a large volume of research. A number of models for MHC-restricted antigen recognition have been advanced over the last several years (2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7), with the consensus revolving around the idea of a three-membered antigen recognition complex composed of the TCR, antigen, and restricting MHC molecires. The exact relationships among and interactions between these three elements, however, have yet to be detailed, even for a single specific case.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning