2015
DOI: 10.1590/1516-1439.316014
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Abstract: Biomaterials are used as a promising alternative to bone grafts, including bioceramics whose composition resembles that of bone and fibrin sealants due to their hemostatic properties. The objective was to evaluate the repair of cranial defects in 40 rats, grafted with hydroxyapatite and a new fibrin sealant derived from snake venom. The animals were divided into four groups: C (control, no graft); Ha (hydroxyapatite); FS (fibrin sealant), and HaFS (hydroxyapatite and fibrin sealant). The animals were euthanize… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(37 citation statements)
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“…Only qualitative data extracted from each study were synthesized in analytic tables. In seven of the 13 included studies, New Zealand rabbits were used [16,[115][116][117][118][119][120], while six studies were conducted in rats, of which three used the Sprague-Dawley strain [17,121,122], two the Wistar strain [123,124] and one the Lewis strain [125]. The calvarial critical-sized defect was the most used model for assessing new bone formation (Table 3).…”
Section: Study Characteristicsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Only qualitative data extracted from each study were synthesized in analytic tables. In seven of the 13 included studies, New Zealand rabbits were used [16,[115][116][117][118][119][120], while six studies were conducted in rats, of which three used the Sprague-Dawley strain [17,121,122], two the Wistar strain [123,124] and one the Lewis strain [125]. The calvarial critical-sized defect was the most used model for assessing new bone formation (Table 3).…”
Section: Study Characteristicsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The captive reproduction of Crotalus durissus terrificus is an important practice once their venom is a natural source of bioactive substances with therapeutic potential, such as antitumoral properties, as well as for antiophidic serum production (Cura et al, 2002;Soares et al, 2010;Calvete et al, 2011;Kumar et al, 2014;Nudel et al, 2012). The search for new drugs has indicated toxins from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom as inhibitors of cell adhesion, cell migration, epidermal tumor growth factor, metastases induced in experimental mice models, and use of some specific proteins for production of drugs (Cura et al, 2002;Cunha et al, 2015;Neves et al, 2015;Reeks et al, 2015).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Next, a defect measuring 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness was created surgically in the left parietal bone of the skullcap, preserving the dura mater. After surgery, the periosteum, soft tissues and skin were repositioned and sutured with 6.0 silk suture, and the animals received routine postoperative care 18 .…”
Section: Experimental Designmentioning
confidence: 99%