2008
DOI: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2008.03.012
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Histopathological differentiation of skin lesions caused by electrocution, flame burns and abrasion

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Cited by 33 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…For example, it is also important to find out differences between electrical marks and similar morphological changes such as warts, callous thickening of the epidermis, thermal injury[29] and abrasion[5]. The purpose of our study is to develop a complementary tool along with traditional methods for providing a more accurate diagnosis.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…For example, it is also important to find out differences between electrical marks and similar morphological changes such as warts, callous thickening of the epidermis, thermal injury[29] and abrasion[5]. The purpose of our study is to develop a complementary tool along with traditional methods for providing a more accurate diagnosis.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Histologically, it is well-known that epidermal nuclear elongation is a typical hallmark of electrical mark and of great diagnostic value for electrocution. However, histological examination is primarily dependent upon the individual subjective judgement, and thus forensic pathologists usually incorporate other methods with routine histopathology for determination of this mark[5], such as computerized image analysis[6] and detection of metallization by scanning electron microscopy[7]. But few provide more insights into the electrical mark at the molecular level, and make an objective diagnosis.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Microscopically, epidermal nuclear elongation in a somewhat parallel fashion (nuclear streaming) and separation in the epidermis are also regarded as meaningful manifestations of electrical injury [10]. In special circumstances, the separation of epidermal cells also can be caused by evaporating tissue fluids depending on the increase in heat, and mild nuclear elongations may also be found in abrasions [11]. Crater-like areas of melted keratin, which are called electrical marks, are found more frequently with high- than low-voltage currents [12].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The frequency of myofibre break-up in cases of electrocution was maximal (90%). Their findings showed that myofibre break-up is a characteristic antemortem histopathological finding in electrocution deaths [10,11,12]. In a case report by Stanca et al, myofibre break-up has been described in a 55 year old women who died of electric current effects [13].…”
Section: Original Research Articlementioning
confidence: 96%