2009
DOI: 10.1080/10350330902816079
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Gender and the semiotics of political visibility in the Brazilian northeast

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Cited by 6 publications
(14 citation statements)
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References 13 publications
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“…People would not fence their land or cultivate it, as everyone knew that the waters were coming (Taddei and Gamboggi 2009). The long distance phone service was disconnected, and banks stopped giving loans to local producers.…”
Section: Attachment and Identity In Development-induced Population DImentioning
confidence: 98%
See 3 more Smart Citations
“…People would not fence their land or cultivate it, as everyone knew that the waters were coming (Taddei and Gamboggi 2009). The long distance phone service was disconnected, and banks stopped giving loans to local producers.…”
Section: Attachment and Identity In Development-induced Population DImentioning
confidence: 98%
“…The announcement of the construction of the dam brought about dramatic economic and political disorganisation (Taddei and Gamboggi 2009). Local economic activity declined, as tenants migrated and landlords tried to sell now devalued lands (Santos 1999, 16).…”
Section: Attachment and Identity In Development-induced Population DImentioning
confidence: 98%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…For this reason, meaningful analyses of participation need to address not only the structures and processes through which participation takes place, but also the broad political contexts that place pressure on participants and significantly shape the participation process (Peterson et al forthcoming). It is of special importance here how the issue of larger ideological configurations set the stage for the construction and use of local meanings (Cooke and Kothari 2001;Kothari 2001;Mohan 2001;Taddei and Gamboggi 2009)-that is, for how participants understand the goals and preferred forms of participation and hence act (or don't) accordingly. A large number of analyses of social participation in natural resources management adopt a structural approach, where the building blocks of participation are tested in different circumstances in the search for conditions where optimal outcomes can be produced (in efficiency or in empowerment-e.g.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%