2007
DOI: 10.1080/01421590601044992
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From calling to a scheduled vocation: Swedish male and female students’ reflections on being a doctor

Abstract: Background: All over the world an increasing number of women are entering medical schools. Soon women will constitute half of the physician workforce in Scandinavia. However, specialty segregation persists. Reports have shown different motives among male and female doctors to be, but the impact of gender, i.e. how ongoing social constructions of femininity and masculinity influence the development of professionalism, is not fully described. Aim: The purpose of this study was to explore views and visions among … Show more

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Cited by 33 publications
(34 citation statements)
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“…Thus, even if Sweden has relatively strong parental leave and childcare provisions, there are still differences in how male and female future physicians plan their careers. In concert with our results, it has been shown before how Swedish medical students receive gendered advice; men were encouraged to stick to what they aspired for and to let family interests come second whereas women were advised to choose a family-friendly specialty [33]. In sum, even if male and female students have similar specialty preferences, it was mainly women and especially those opting for family medicine that planned for work-family balance.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 73%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…Thus, even if Sweden has relatively strong parental leave and childcare provisions, there are still differences in how male and female future physicians plan their careers. In concert with our results, it has been shown before how Swedish medical students receive gendered advice; men were encouraged to stick to what they aspired for and to let family interests come second whereas women were advised to choose a family-friendly specialty [33]. In sum, even if male and female students have similar specialty preferences, it was mainly women and especially those opting for family medicine that planned for work-family balance.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 73%
“…This finding is supported by a Swedish study where male and female students described how their reception among colleagues was important when making their career choices [33]. Also, an American study found that the reason for more men choosing surgery could not be explained by the women being deterred from surgery during their clinical rotations but rather that they received more support elsewhere [1].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 70%
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“…29,30 In the present study as shown in Table 3, the various reasons for choosing medical school as a career in which 50 (31.44%) choose by their own choice. In the present study it was seen that 29 (27.88%) of the students felt that the work load was too hard as shown in Table 4.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Additionally, men nurses face contradictory and complex situations of acceptance, mainly because the stereotype of men as sexual aggressors creates suspicion in situations where there is intimate touching (Evans 2002). Furthermore, gender plays a role in specialty choice (Reichenbach and Brown 2004;Johansson and Hamberg 2007).…”
Section: Practical Guidelines For Implementation and Facilitating Facmentioning
confidence: 99%