2017
DOI: 10.1590/1678-4162-9430
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: In order to improve the management and maintenance of the quality of life of captive wild birds, this study aimed to assess the food preferences of cockatiel chicks (Nymphicus hollandicus) kept in captivity. Thirty-two cockatiel chicks, three to 12 months of age, were kept in a galvanized, wire-netted vivarium with six ceramic feeders, two for an extruded diet, two for a dry-mashed diet and two for a seed mixture. Both extruded and drymashed food are commercial psittacine diets. Three round ceramic pots were u… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1

Citation Types

0
1
0
1

Year Published

2021
2021
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 3 publications
(2 citation statements)
references
References 7 publications
(2 reference statements)
0
1
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…En su hábitat natural, las cacatúas ninfa pueden volar kilómetros para balancear su dieta basada en más de 60 tipos de semillas y algunas frutas, flores, hojas e insectos (Naves et al, 2017;Orosz, 2014). En cautiverio su dieta no es tan diversa y su actividad física es reducida, ya que usualmente los propietarios utilizan mezclas con una poca variedad de semillas y la capacidad del ave para forrajear y volar disminuye considerablemente (Orosz, 2014).…”
Section: Nutriciónunclassified
“…En su hábitat natural, las cacatúas ninfa pueden volar kilómetros para balancear su dieta basada en más de 60 tipos de semillas y algunas frutas, flores, hojas e insectos (Naves et al, 2017;Orosz, 2014). En cautiverio su dieta no es tan diversa y su actividad física es reducida, ya que usualmente los propietarios utilizan mezclas con una poca variedad de semillas y la capacidad del ave para forrajear y volar disminuye considerablemente (Orosz, 2014).…”
Section: Nutriciónunclassified
“…Researchers evaluate preference by presenting two foods concurrently and evaluating which the animal selects (Clay et al, 2009; Gaalema et al, 2011; Mehrkam & Dorey, 2015). A good understanding of food preference facilitates the identification of effective reinforcers to support training (Fernandez et al, 2004; Martin et al, 2018), improves husbandry practice (Addessi et al, 2005; Alligood et al, 2017; Naves et al, 2017), and supports overall welfare (Mehrkam & Dorey, 2015; Steele et al, 1995). While nonfood reinforcers can be used to train animals (e.g., for general husbandry and health checks) food is often a powerful motivator and several research groups have undertaken studies to understand what food items best serve as reinforcers for species or individual animals in human care (Clay et al, 2009; Gaalema et al, 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%