2009
DOI: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.01.020
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Food intake and its relationship with semen quality: a case-control study

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
2

Citation Types

5
121
7
1

Year Published

2011
2011
2017
2017

Publication Types

Select...
5
4

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 137 publications
(134 citation statements)
references
References 61 publications
5
121
7
1
Order By: Relevance
“…We previously reported that processed meat intake is associated with lower total sperm count among physically active healthy young men (17). A study in Spain found that intake of processed red meats was ;31% higher among oligoasthenoteratospermic men than among controls but did not find any difference in fish intake between cases and controls (13). Another study in the Netherlands found that fish and other seafood was associated with higher sperm motility (14).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…We previously reported that processed meat intake is associated with lower total sperm count among physically active healthy young men (17). A study in Spain found that intake of processed red meats was ;31% higher among oligoasthenoteratospermic men than among controls but did not find any difference in fish intake between cases and controls (13). Another study in the Netherlands found that fish and other seafood was associated with higher sperm motility (14).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…The existing literature on the relation between meat intake and semen quality indicators is scarce and limited to crosssectional and case-control studies (13)(14)(15)(16)(17). We have previously reported that processed meat intake is associated with lower total sperm count among physically active healthy young men (17).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a case -control study of 30 men with poor semen quality and 31 normospermic controls, controls had significantly higher intake of lettuce, tomatoes and fruits (Mendiola et al, 2009). In an observational study of 250 men undergoing ICSI, sperm motility was positively influenced by consumption of fruits and cereals (Braga et al, 2012).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In addition, many recent studies report that inappropriate dietary habits (such as meal skipping or false dieting), low intake of antioxidants, and nutrient deficiencies have been observed in male factor infertility. 25,28,[47][48][49][50] The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that investigated the relationship between nutrition, diet, or food compounds and male factor infertility. As far as can be determined, this is the first systematic review of studies that examined the relation between nutrition or dietary compounds and male infertility.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%