2014
DOI: 10.1111/phor.12086
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First world war aerial photography: 1914

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Cited by 4 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…The year 1917 had seen the partial exit of Russia from the conflict together with the entry of the United States (although it was only during the latter half of 1918 that the effect of American intervention would be fully felt). This is echoed in Table where, compared with the equivalent tables in previous years (see Granshaw, , , , ), the Eastern Front has been renamed Eastern Theatre and its column width drastically reduced, indicating the 1918 focus on the Western Front. Notwithstanding this, the Southern Front (primarily between Italy and Austria‐Hungary), together with the Middle East conflict (mainly between Britain and Turkey) were still very active theatres.…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 88%
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“…The year 1917 had seen the partial exit of Russia from the conflict together with the entry of the United States (although it was only during the latter half of 1918 that the effect of American intervention would be fully felt). This is echoed in Table where, compared with the equivalent tables in previous years (see Granshaw, , , , ), the Eastern Front has been renamed Eastern Theatre and its column width drastically reduced, indicating the 1918 focus on the Western Front. Notwithstanding this, the Southern Front (primarily between Italy and Austria‐Hungary), together with the Middle East conflict (mainly between Britain and Turkey) were still very active theatres.…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…This is the final Editorial of a quintet in The Photogrammetric Record outlining the role of aerial photography 100 years ago during the First World War (see also Granshaw, , , , ). The current Editorial examines the year 1918, where burgeoning numbers of aerial photographs contributed to ending that bloody conflict.…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…On the Allied side, Streckfuss (, p 113) relates: In order to keep the maps up to date the latest aerial photographs were projected onto a recent Plan Directeur , which the analyst then moved until the details of the photo matched the ground depicted on the map ”. Furthermore, the 25 to 120 cm glass plate aerial cameras reported in Granshaw (, ) would remain the norm in 1916; the Frontispiece shows the newly developed British ‘L’ type. The Zeiss 50 cm Großkammer with its 24 cm film width, which was 60 m long and capable of taking 200 photographs, would not enter service until 1917, which will be analysed in issue 160.…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The December 2014 Editorial in the Record (Granshaw, ) outlined the fledgling role of aerial photography during the first few months of the First World War after its outbreak in August 1914. The current Editorial extends that account to 1915, looking back a century to the first full year of the conflict.…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Granshaw () noted that during 1914 most of the aerial photographs taken on both the Western and Eastern fronts were German (Fig. ).…”
Section: Major Events On the Various Fronts Of The First World War Inmentioning
confidence: 99%