2021
DOI: 10.3389/fmars.2021.767628
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Experimental Assessment of Vulnerability to Warming in Tropical Shallow-Water Marine Organisms

Abstract: Tropical shallow-water habitats represent the marine environments with the greatest biodiversity; however, these habitats are the most vulnerable to climate warming. Corals, seagrasses, and macroalgae play a crucial role in the structure, functions, and processes of the coastal ecosystems. Understanding their growth and physiological responses to elevated temperature and interspecific sensitivity is a necessary step to predict the fate of future coastal community. Six species representatives, including Pocillo… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 120 publications
(208 reference statements)
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“…Inhibition of photosynthesis by warming was also detected in C. rotundata measured as lower ETR and T. hemprichii measured as lower ETR, oxygen release and DIC uptake. These results agree with previous reports in C. rotundata , T. hemprichii and other tropical seagrasses ( Collier & Waycott, 2014 ; Pedersen et al, 2016 ; George et al, 2020 ; Rasmusson et al, 2020 ; Rasmusson et al, 2021 ; Yucharoen et al, 2021 ). Nevertheless, in the present study, such photoinhibition did not affect gas exchange in the BG tissues of C. rotundata and T. hemprichii , pointing to the significance of efficient regulation of internal oxygen levels in these two seagrasses.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 93%
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“…Inhibition of photosynthesis by warming was also detected in C. rotundata measured as lower ETR and T. hemprichii measured as lower ETR, oxygen release and DIC uptake. These results agree with previous reports in C. rotundata , T. hemprichii and other tropical seagrasses ( Collier & Waycott, 2014 ; Pedersen et al, 2016 ; George et al, 2020 ; Rasmusson et al, 2020 ; Rasmusson et al, 2021 ; Yucharoen et al, 2021 ). Nevertheless, in the present study, such photoinhibition did not affect gas exchange in the BG tissues of C. rotundata and T. hemprichii , pointing to the significance of efficient regulation of internal oxygen levels in these two seagrasses.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 93%
“…Halophila are colonizing species, characterized by relatively high growth and turnover rates ( Kilminster et al, 2015 ; O’Brien et al, 2018 ; Lamit & Tanaka, 2021 ), while Cymodocea and Thalassia are considered opportunistic and persistent seagrasses, respectively ( Kilminster et al, 2015 ; O’Brien et al, 2018 ). Previous observations reported similar aboveground productivity between C. rotundata and T. hemprichii ( Cebrián et al, 1998 ; Yamamuro & Chirapart, 2005 ; Collier & Waycott, 2014 ) and higher aboveground productivity in H. ovalis ( Yamamuro & Chirapart, 2005 ; Yucharoen et al, 2021 ). In the present study, H. ovalis also displayed unique responses among the three tested species seen as significant modulation of gas exchange under changing conditions.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 53%
“…Since the mid-18th century, atmospheric CO 2 has risen from 280 to 400 ppm, and is predicted to increase to 730-1200 ppm by 2100 as a result of human activities, such as the burning of fossil fuel, deforestation, agriculture and industrialization [1,2]. This has led to an increase in sea-surface temperature (ocean warming) and a decrease in ocean pH (ocean acidification), which have affected a range of marine floras and faunas [3][4][5]. Macroalgae play important roles as primary producers in the marine food chain and serve as habitat for various animals, which directly contribute to the livelihood and food security of the coastal community [6,7].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%