2002
DOI: 10.1007/s00431-002-1038-1
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Eosinophilic fasciitis leading to painless contractures

Abstract: our case shows that eosinophilic fasciitis can present without skin involvement and arthritis and therefore has to be regarded as a differential diagnosis of contractures in childhood. Pulsed steroid treatment was effective and without side-effects.

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Cited by 31 publications
(15 citation statements)
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“…This clinical picture might be a phenotype of EF specific to childhood. 5 The cause of EF is unknown; however it has been reported in association with Borrelia burdogferi infection 15 and L-tryptophan ingestion. 16,17 It is unclear whether the history of taxidermy in our patient's bedroom had any potential relationship to her condition as tryptophan is not used in taxidermy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This clinical picture might be a phenotype of EF specific to childhood. 5 The cause of EF is unknown; however it has been reported in association with Borrelia burdogferi infection 15 and L-tryptophan ingestion. 16,17 It is unclear whether the history of taxidermy in our patient's bedroom had any potential relationship to her condition as tryptophan is not used in taxidermy.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…To our knowledge, a total of 32 childhood cases have been reported in the English-language medical literature. [3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13] In the current report, we describe a 12-year-old girl with painless joint contractures and induration of the extremities consistent with EF. …”
mentioning
confidence: 93%
“…2,9 Eosinophilic fasciitis is another condition that can resemble Wells' syndrome. Also seen more frequently among adults but reported in children, 18,19 it presents with acute onset of skin inflammation and resolves with hyperpigmentation and sclerodermalike skin changes. Unlike Wells' syndrome, eosinophilic fasciitis is characterized by arthritis as a prominent symptom, and it follows a more chronic course, with individual lesions requiring months or years to resolve.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These are part of eosinophilic fibrosing disorders and share clinical and pathological features with EF but may include visceral disease [3, 27, 28]. Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome in the late eighties was largely induced by ingestion of L -tryptophan [3, 29]. Some cases of EF are reported after L -tryptophan ingestion, suggesting an overlap in the pathogenesis [30, 31].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%