2021
DOI: 10.3390/d13090416
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Endemic and Threatened Amazona Parrots of the Atlantic Forest: An Overview of Their Geographic Range and Population Size

Abstract: Amazona is the largest genus of the Psittacidae, one of the most threatened bird families. Here, we study four species of Amazona (Amazona brasiliensis, A. pretrei, A. vinacea, and A. rhodocorytha) that are dependent on a highly vulnerable biome: the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. To examine their distribution and abundance, we compile abundance estimates and counts, and develop site-occupancy models of their geographic range. These models integrate data from formal research and citizen science platforms to estima… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 40 publications
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“…However, single counts at communal roosts, such as those performed here, do not allow for the identification of uncertainty in population size estimates related to detection errors, which may lead to the underestimation of real population numbers [67,68]. Despite these limitations, roost counts allow a reasonable lower bound for estimating the total population size (e.g., [66]) and its temporal changes (e.g., [68]) when individuals concentrate in well-known localities, thus reducing the probability of overlooking large flocks during census [68]. In the case of rose-ringed parakeets in Seville, we cannot discard small counting errors that may slightly affect annual population sizes, but they are overweighed by the easy locating of the largest roosts [47].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
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“…However, single counts at communal roosts, such as those performed here, do not allow for the identification of uncertainty in population size estimates related to detection errors, which may lead to the underestimation of real population numbers [67,68]. Despite these limitations, roost counts allow a reasonable lower bound for estimating the total population size (e.g., [66]) and its temporal changes (e.g., [68]) when individuals concentrate in well-known localities, thus reducing the probability of overlooking large flocks during census [68]. In the case of rose-ringed parakeets in Seville, we cannot discard small counting errors that may slightly affect annual population sizes, but they are overweighed by the easy locating of the largest roosts [47].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…Monk parakeets, on the other hand, have grown exponentially but seem to have reached a stability of about 1500 individuals, distributed in several breeding nuclei scattered throughout the study area. Population censuses, through counts of individuals at roosts, are suitable for communal roosting species, such as some parrot species [44,[65][66][67][68]. However, single counts at communal roosts, such as those performed here, do not allow for the identification of uncertainty in population size estimates related to detection errors, which may lead to the underestimation of real population numbers [67,68].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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