2003
DOI: 10.1086/342589
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Encountering Latin American and Caribbean Feminisms

Abstract: 2 Encountering Latin American and Caribbean FeminismsIn November 1999, nearly 1,300 women from virtually every country in Latin America and the Caribbean journeyed to the coastal town of Juan Dolio, Dominican Republic, to take part in an event that many of the region's activists have come to regard as a key arena for collectively reimagining feminism and its relationship to a wide range of struggles for human dignity and social justice. Since the first such gathering was convened in Bogotá, Colombia, in 1981, … Show more

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Cited by 196 publications
(48 citation statements)
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“…They had a history of regional exchanges through their famous Encuentros (Sternbach et al 1992;Alvarez et al 2003), held every three years, and regional networks campaigning together on issues such as sexual and reproductive rights and violence against women. This contributed towards building a more orchestrated position, such that, despite a relatively small group participating in Beijing (about 2,000 women, 300 of them Brazilians), they could act as a block.…”
Section: Brazilian Feminisms and Beijing 1995mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…They had a history of regional exchanges through their famous Encuentros (Sternbach et al 1992;Alvarez et al 2003), held every three years, and regional networks campaigning together on issues such as sexual and reproductive rights and violence against women. This contributed towards building a more orchestrated position, such that, despite a relatively small group participating in Beijing (about 2,000 women, 300 of them Brazilians), they could act as a block.…”
Section: Brazilian Feminisms and Beijing 1995mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…in Latin America, see: Saporta Sternbach et al (1992), Craske (1999Craske ( , 2000, Alvarez et al (2003), and on Peru: Vargas (1991Vargas ( , 2004, and Lievesley (1996). 4 This draws on my own work on gender and violence, as discussed in Boesten (2006Boesten ( , 2007Boesten ( , 2008Boesten ( , 2009Boesten ( , 2010aBoesten ( , 2010bBoesten ( , 2010cBoesten ( , and 2014.…”
Section: Butler's Thinkingmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While early feminist activism in the 1980s concentrated on community training at the grassroots level, in the 1990s many feminist organizations adopted advocacy strategies directed at influencing government policies, including those on reproductive rights (Barrig 1989, Vargas 1992, Blondet 2002, Rousseau 2006. As several studies show, this shift in strategy has occurred across Latin America and feminist advocacy has resulted in important changes to laws and policies (Matear 1997, Franco 1998, Alvarez 1998, Schild 1998, Barrig 2001, Alvarez et al 2002, Lind 2004.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The second period, between the 1990s and 2000s, consists of the adoption of advocacy as a strategy to influence government policies in tandem with the emerging globalization of feminism (Franco 1998, Alvarez 1998, Alvarez et al 2002. Through community training, coalition members learned that women lacked legal protection and public sector workers lacked policy directives to back new practices.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%