Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
4
1

Citation Types

1
26
1

Year Published

2011
2011
2018
2018

Publication Types

Select...
5

Relationship

1
4

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 21 publications
references
References 73 publications
1
26
1
Order By: Relevance
“…However both may be tightly connected in the sense that "vocal correlates of motivation imply an underlying emotion" [see review Briefer, 2012]. Changes in vocal parameters in response to emotional states are expected in mammals [Coss et al, 2007;Scheiner & Fisher, 2011;Scherer & Kappas, 1988] in line with the motivationalstructural rules of acoustic signals [August & Anderson, 1987;Manser, 2010;Morton, 1977]. Adult chimpanzee screams indeed varied acoustically reflecting the motivational state of the caller [Siebert & Parr, 2003].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…However both may be tightly connected in the sense that "vocal correlates of motivation imply an underlying emotion" [see review Briefer, 2012]. Changes in vocal parameters in response to emotional states are expected in mammals [Coss et al, 2007;Scheiner & Fisher, 2011;Scherer & Kappas, 1988] in line with the motivationalstructural rules of acoustic signals [August & Anderson, 1987;Manser, 2010;Morton, 1977]. Adult chimpanzee screams indeed varied acoustically reflecting the motivational state of the caller [Siebert & Parr, 2003].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…To support these complex social interactions, humans are equipped with a powerful tool-the face (although see also research on voice and body posture, e.g., Atkinson et al 2004, Belin et al 2008, Cordaro et al 2015, Dael et al 2012, de Gelder 2009, Grezes et al 2007, Pollick et al 2001, Roether et al 2009, Scheiner & Fischer 2011. As a rich source of information, the human face can elicit myriad immediate social judgments-for example, about identity (e.g., Gauthier et al 1999, pattern of a happy facial expression is transmitted through the medium of light (i.e., photons) to the visual system of another human.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Does volubility across vocal types vary with circumstance, suggesting that different speech-like sounds may have consistently different functions? Until recently, research had provided a preliminary answer to this question, suggesting considerable flexibility of usage of sounds across circumstances (Papaeliou, Minadakis, & Cavouras, 2002; Hsu, Iyer, & Fogel, 2013; Scheiner & Fischer, 2011; Scheiner, Hammerschmidt, Jurgens, & Zwirner, 2006; Stark, Bernstein, & Demorest, 1993; Oller, 2000). A recent study, however, illustrates more conclusively that the human infant shows extraordinary flexibility of usage of vocal types across different circumstances, apparently much greater flexibility than seen in any other primate at any age (Oller et al, 2013).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%