Dutch Studies 1980
DOI: 10.1007/978-94-009-8855-2_13
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Egg, Onion, Ouch! On The Representation Of Dutch Diphthongs

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Cited by 8 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…No doubt the fact that the leftmost position of the rime is always occupied by a vowel follows from universal considerations, while the rightmost position appears simply to be free: it may be a vowel as second half of a long vowel, it may be the second half of a diphthong (which pattern with long vowels in Dutch; see Zonneveld and Trommelen 1980), and it may be a sonorant or an obstruent consonant, as in (8) and (9). Especially with regard to the latter we differ from Trommelen (1983), who has an XX-rime if a sonorant occupies second position, but allows XXX if there is an obstruent in third position (pamflet, plank-ton).…”
Section: ?Idmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…No doubt the fact that the leftmost position of the rime is always occupied by a vowel follows from universal considerations, while the rightmost position appears simply to be free: it may be a vowel as second half of a long vowel, it may be the second half of a diphthong (which pattern with long vowels in Dutch; see Zonneveld and Trommelen 1980), and it may be a sonorant or an obstruent consonant, as in (8) and (9). Especially with regard to the latter we differ from Trommelen (1983), who has an XX-rime if a sonorant occupies second position, but allows XXX if there is an obstruent in third position (pamflet, plank-ton).…”
Section: ?Idmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In fact, if one analyses these entities as short vowels followed by a /j/ or /w/, they fit the paradigm of rhymes that contain a short vowels and a sonorant liquid or nasal (as suggested in van der Hulst, 1984). However, Zonneveld and Trommelen (1980) show that diphthongs behave like 'superheavy syllables' with regard to stress, and that means that, like 'superheavy syllables', they do act like branching feet. Also, if /j/ and /w/ are analysed as vowel entities in consonant position, it could be argued that two vocalic units within the rhyme are not possible, just as two obstruents are not possible in a branching onset.…”
Section: Diphthongs As Two Rhymesmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…Dutch has a well-known phonological process of "coloring" of a (long) vowel when it is followed by r. See, for instance, Zonneveld and Trommelen (1980), Nespor and Vogel (1986), Trommelen and Zonneveld (1989b). The rule operates both in foreign and native words.…”
Section: Vowel Coloring Before Rmentioning
confidence: 99%