2008
DOI: 10.1016/j.lingua.2007.09.012
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The Dutch diminutive

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Cited by 9 publications
(6 citation statements)
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“…These morphological alternations have led researchers to come up with a phonological feature that distinguishes long and high vowels on the one hand from nonhigh short vowels on the other hand, such as the feature /tense/ versus /lax/ (van der Hulst 1984), or phonological strength (Ewen 1978), or opaque prosodic structure (van der Hulst 2007), none of which have a phonetic correlate. One possible conclusion from these attempts is to say that the feature involved here is in fact phonetically arbitrary, that is, phonological-only in a language-specific way, because we do not find this specific type of grouping in many other languages.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These morphological alternations have led researchers to come up with a phonological feature that distinguishes long and high vowels on the one hand from nonhigh short vowels on the other hand, such as the feature /tense/ versus /lax/ (van der Hulst 1984), or phonological strength (Ewen 1978), or opaque prosodic structure (van der Hulst 2007), none of which have a phonetic correlate. One possible conclusion from these attempts is to say that the feature involved here is in fact phonetically arbitrary, that is, phonological-only in a language-specific way, because we do not find this specific type of grouping in many other languages.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An alternative account for selection of the proper allomorph was presented by Van der Hulst (2008), for whom the crucial factor is not the segmental properties of the stem but rather its prosodic structural organisation -specifically with sensitivity to the branching structure at the foot level -, which determines choice of either the allomorphic variant -etje or -tje (the latter further showing up as -kje, -pje due to assimilation).…”
Section: Theoretical Accountsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…-etje, -etje, -je, -pje and -kje ([ət j ə], [t j ə], [jə], [pjə], [kjə]). Their distribution has been studied before (see Cohen 1958;Trommelen 1984;Van der Hulst 2008 and references therein) and the facts are rather intricate. For the data under discussion it is important to note that a short vowel followed by an obstruent will select -je, a stressed short vowel followed by a sonorant selects -etje and a non-stressed short vowel or a long vowel followed by a sonorant selects -tje.…”
Section: The Diminutive Affixmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Diminutives formed with the allomorph -etje show exceptional phonological behavior in various respects (Lowenstamm and van der Wilt 1982;Van der Hulst 2008). A discussion of these long forms would take us too far afield, even though the list of vowel length alternating roots does contain roots which do select -etje, viz.…”
Section: The Diminutive Affixmentioning
confidence: 99%