2017
DOI: 10.1590/s1806-92902017000200005
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Effects of carob ( Ceratonia siliqua ) pod byproduct on quail performance, egg characteristics, fatty acids, and cholesterol levels

Abstract: -This study was carried out to determine the effects of a carob (Ceratonia siliqua) byproduct (CB) supplement in diets for laying Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) on performance and egg internal-external quality traits, fatty acid profile, and cholesterol content. A total of 225 female quail at 12 weeks of age were distributed into five treatment groups with three replications (15 birds in each replication). The following treatments were tested: 0% (control, no CB supplementation); 3% CB; 5% CB; 10%… Show more

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Cited by 5 publications
(9 citation statements)
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References 18 publications
(22 reference statements)
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“…Along with fats, carobs can be successfully used at a 20% level in chicken rations in those areas where there is a shortage of cereals. Our results are in agreement with the reports of Yıldırım and Kaya (2011) , Sahle et al (1992) , Calislar and Kaplan (2017) , in which ground carob supplement in broiler (5–20%), geese (up to 200 g/kg), and quail (3–15%) diets did not affect significantly growth performance. According to Calislar and Kaplan (2017) despite the presence of tannins in carob powder, which can reduce feed intake and body weight, the sweet taste of the carob powder supplement may result in higher feed intake.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
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“…Along with fats, carobs can be successfully used at a 20% level in chicken rations in those areas where there is a shortage of cereals. Our results are in agreement with the reports of Yıldırım and Kaya (2011) , Sahle et al (1992) , Calislar and Kaplan (2017) , in which ground carob supplement in broiler (5–20%), geese (up to 200 g/kg), and quail (3–15%) diets did not affect significantly growth performance. According to Calislar and Kaplan (2017) despite the presence of tannins in carob powder, which can reduce feed intake and body weight, the sweet taste of the carob powder supplement may result in higher feed intake.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 93%
“…The crude protein content in our study was higher than that reported by Calislar and Kaplan (2017) (4%) and by Kyriacou et al (2021) for Italian carobs (4.21 ± 0.22%). However, a similar protein level was reported by Vekiari et al (2012) for Greek select genotypes (6.4 ± 0.18%) and by Youssef et al (2013) for Egyptian genotype (6.34%).…”
Section: Resultscontrasting
confidence: 85%
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“…However, by week 19 it was elevated (P <0.05) for the groups that were fed raw chickpeas compared with the control and heat-treated groups (Table 7). This result supports those of Calislar & Kaplan (2017) and Cimrin et al (2019). The chickpeas used in the present study contained 0.07% gamma-linolenic acid.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 90%
“…In the yolks of eggs from birds fed raw chickpeas, the microwave treatment reduced their stearic acid content at the 19th week (P <0.05), whereas this effect was not detected at week 13. Feeding raw chickpeas might have produced a slightly lower stearic acid content of the egg yolks, and processing them, particularly with microwaves, may have increased it slightly, which is consistent with the results of Calislar and Kaplan (2017). The amount of palmitoleic acid in the egg yolk of the control and treatment groups at week 13 was between 2.71% and 2.14% and was not significantly different (Table 6).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 83%