Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

7
96
0
1

Year Published

2009
2009
2015
2015

Publication Types

Select...
2

Relationship

0
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 145 publications
(104 citation statements)
references
References 13 publications
7
96
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…In these configurations, and to a lesser extent in the lateral configuration, the dummy also exhibited an initial s-shape phase where the torso was significantly stopped. A similar behaviour had been described in tests using full cadavers and cervical spine segments in axial loading 24,25,37 , or in FE simulations of head and neck in combined axial and lateral loading 7 . When induced by constraining the head in rotation in cervical spine segments, it was associated with Bilateral Facet Dislocation at the lower cervical spine level 23 .…”
Section: Comparison With the Literaturesupporting
confidence: 64%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…In these configurations, and to a lesser extent in the lateral configuration, the dummy also exhibited an initial s-shape phase where the torso was significantly stopped. A similar behaviour had been described in tests using full cadavers and cervical spine segments in axial loading 24,25,37 , or in FE simulations of head and neck in combined axial and lateral loading 7 . When induced by constraining the head in rotation in cervical spine segments, it was associated with Bilateral Facet Dislocation at the lower cervical spine level 23 .…”
Section: Comparison With the Literaturesupporting
confidence: 64%
“…When induced by constraining the head in rotation in cervical spine segments, it was associated with Bilateral Facet Dislocation at the lower cervical spine level 23 . However, the ATD did not exhibit the bi-modal behaviour sometimes observed in cadaveric segments 24 , as upper and lower neck force maxima occurred simultaneously, and did not present dynamic buckling or any higher order buckling shapes as reported by these authors. Figure 8 presents the peak impact forces compared to results from similar configuration cadaveric drop-tests in the sagittal plane 26,37 .…”
Section: Comparison With the Literaturesupporting
confidence: 44%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This also has theoretical basis regarding the vulnerability of the spine when loaded along its stiffest axis (Liu and Dai 1989). Under similar loading conditions, fractures of the cervical spine have been observed to occur well before significant motion of the skull (Myers and Nightingale 1999;Nightingale et al 1996), which supports the concept that the transmission of force through the spine is more important than the resulting angular kinematics. On the other hand, the angular motion of the head, an important factor in most brain injuries, was highly correlated with impact orientation.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 54%
“…A 28 kg steel plate, padded and unpadded, impacted the temporoparietal junction above the external auditory meatus with a velocity of approximately 6 m/s. Nightingale et al (1996) and Toomey et al (2009) conducted inverted axial impacts at approximately 3.2 m/s with ligamentous cadaver head-neck complexes against surfaces of varying orientation to determine the effects of head inertia and impact surface on injury risk to the cervical spine. Select time-dependent responses of the THUMS-for example, resultant head CG acceleration-resulting from the simulated experimental conditions were quantitatively compared to the physical test results, where available, via cross-correlation analysis.…”
Section: Experiments Reconstruction With Thumsmentioning
confidence: 99%