2013
DOI: 10.1590/s1676-06032013000100010
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Abstract: Ants are one of the most important animal groups in tropical forests because of its abundance and number of species. An important characteristic of the group is the eusociality, which allows the occurrence of a recruitment behavior when food resource is found. However, there are two main questions regarding this behavior: (i) the recruitment is a product of environmental or phylogenetic pressures, and (ii) the recruitment speed is related to the body size of the ant species. In this work we addressed these two… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 48 publications
(51 reference statements)
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“…31 verified in a study with Anemopaegma album (Bignoniaceae) that the greatest difference between the outcome of the interactions among the populations was due to differences in the species and behaviour of the ants. Godoy & Camargo 67 reported that body size influences foraging behaviour, where small ants are not only more abundant and active than large ants, but also recruit more consistently.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…31 verified in a study with Anemopaegma album (Bignoniaceae) that the greatest difference between the outcome of the interactions among the populations was due to differences in the species and behaviour of the ants. Godoy & Camargo 67 reported that body size influences foraging behaviour, where small ants are not only more abundant and active than large ants, but also recruit more consistently.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We then used simple linear regressions to assess the bivariate relationships between EFN traits and herbivory versus ant size and recruitment across ant species (N = 15 ant species). We hypothesized a negative relationship between ant size and recruitment [ 36 ], and a positive relationship between ant size and EFN abundance due to the higher energetic requirement of bigger ant species (and consequently inverse relationship with ant recruitment). Finally, we considered these relationships as the phenotype-functional links (or phenotypic interface) between ants and EFNs.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%