2015
DOI: 10.1002/ece3.1542
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Discovery–dominance trade‐off among widespread invasive ant species

Abstract: Ants are among the most problematic invasive species. They displace numerous native species, alter ecosystem processes, and can have negative impacts on agriculture and human health. In part, their success might stem from a departure from the discovery–dominance trade-off that can promote co-existence in native ant communities, that is, invasive ants are thought to be at the same time behaviorally dominant and faster discoverers of resources, compared to native species. However, it has not yet been tested whet… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(18 citation statements)
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“…Our results are consistent with the correlation between food resource discovery and dominance known in ant ecology (Parr & Gibb 2012). P. megacephala is the fastest explorer and most efficient exploiter among four of the most problematic invasive ant species (not found on Reunion Island): Linepithema humile (Mayr), Lasius neglectus Van Loon et al and Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger) (Bertelsmeier, Avril, Blight, Jourdan, & Courchamp 2015). In addition, in this omnivore-poor community, decreasing the richness of intraguild predators could enhance bait egg removal.…”
Section: Predator and Omnivore Species Richness Have Contrasting Effesupporting
confidence: 88%
“…Our results are consistent with the correlation between food resource discovery and dominance known in ant ecology (Parr & Gibb 2012). P. megacephala is the fastest explorer and most efficient exploiter among four of the most problematic invasive ant species (not found on Reunion Island): Linepithema humile (Mayr), Lasius neglectus Van Loon et al and Wasmannia auropunctata (Roger) (Bertelsmeier, Avril, Blight, Jourdan, & Courchamp 2015). In addition, in this omnivore-poor community, decreasing the richness of intraguild predators could enhance bait egg removal.…”
Section: Predator and Omnivore Species Richness Have Contrasting Effesupporting
confidence: 88%
“…Within this group, Lasius neglectus (Van Loon, Boomsma, & Andrasfalvy, 1990) is a major pest that has experienced an extraordinarily rapid diffusion over a large part of Europe in the last two decades (Seifert, ; Tartally, Antonova, Espadaler, Csősz, & Czechowski, ; Ugelvig et al, ). Notwithstanding the low level of its individual fighting ability (Frizzi, Bartalesi, & Santini, ; Santarlasci, Martelloni, Frizzi, Santini, & Bagnoli, ), this species fills a top position in ant competitive hierarchies, mainly due to the huge number of nestmates that can be recruited to monopolise resources (Bertelsmeier, Avril, Blight, Jourdan, & Courchamp, ; Paris & Espadaler, ). In general, the abilities to quickly discover and monopolise resources are crucial traits contributing to the success of invasive species, as has also been documented in Solenopsis invicta (Porter & Savignano, ), Linepithema humile (Holway, ), Formica fuscocinerea (Pohl, Ziemen, & Witte, ) Pheidole megacephala and Anoplolepis gracilipes (Ward & Beggs, ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous studies have suggested that compositional changes (abundance and occupancy) may alter the dominance of a genus or alter the position of species in an interactive network in ants 49 or in bacterial communities 103 . Whilst we standby the view that competition for food is an important process structuring communities 41 , our results do suggest that a number of other interacting factors could be having a large effect, and these may even be other components of competitive behaviour such as the discovery-dominance trade off that considers arrival time to a food resource 73 , 104 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 52%