2004
DOI: 10.1590/s0102-09352004000400020
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Detection of double-stranded RNA viruses in fecal samples of dogs with gastroenteritis in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Cited by 16 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…Costa et al [17] also detected the virus in low- frequency in samples from dogs with gastroenteritis (3/163 vs 1.84 %). On the other hand, studies carried out in chickens [1,49], foals [9], dogs [23] and calves [77] did not find any association between PBV detection and disease.…”
Section: The Pathogenic Potentialmentioning
confidence: 95%
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“…Costa et al [17] also detected the virus in low- frequency in samples from dogs with gastroenteritis (3/163 vs 1.84 %). On the other hand, studies carried out in chickens [1,49], foals [9], dogs [23] and calves [77] did not find any association between PBV detection and disease.…”
Section: The Pathogenic Potentialmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Later, PBVs have been identified in faecal specimens of humans practically worldwide [3, 6, 7, 14, 26-29, 51, 55, 56, 61, 68, 76]. PBVs were also detected in faeces of a wide variety of farm mammals, birds, wild animals and birds kept in captivity, etc., viz., pigs [2,4,16,31,34,50,56,67], calves [10,15,35,53,54,61,77,79], rabbits and guinea pigs [25,43,52,65], bats [86], red fox [8], avian such as chickens & poults [1,49,59,69,73], and other wild animals kept in captivity like Giant Anteaters [45]; giant cats like Lion, Puma, Jaguar and Geoffroy's cat [37], sea lion [84], human primates such as Orangutan, wild birds such as American Ostrich, gloomy pheasant, Chinese goose [57], goat kids and lambs [60], donkeys [57,58], foals [9,30], laboratory non-human primates such as rhesus, pigtailed macaques and cynomolgus monkeys [83] and dogs [17,23,81], rats [23,64], snakes [23] and turkeys …”
Section: Discovery Of Picobirnavirusmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…After being reported in the year 1988 (Pereira et al, 1988b), PBVs have been detected in stools samples of several species of animals and from different countries, including rabbits (Gallimore et al, 1993;Ludert et al, 1995), dogs (Costa et al, 2004), cattle (Buzinaro et al, 2003;Malik et al, 2014;Vanpodenbosch and Wellemans, 1990), foals (Ganesh et al, 2011b), pigs (Bányai et al, 2008;Carruyo et al, 2008;Ganesh et al, 2012;Martínez et al, 2010), guinea pigs (Pereira et al, 1989), rats (Pereira et al, 1988a), monkeys (Wang et al, 2007), giant anteaters (Haga et al, 1999), orangutans, armadillos (Masachessi et al, 2007), Pantheraleo, Pantheraonca, Puma concolor, Oncifelis geoffroyi (Gillman et al, 2013), snakes (Fregolente et al, 2009), chickens (Tamehiro et al, 2003), geese, pheasants, pelicans (Masachessi et al, 2007) and humans (Gallimore et al, 1995;Ganesh et al, 2010Ganesh et al, , 2011aGiordano et al, 1998;Grohmann et al, 1993;Pereira et al, 1988b). PBVs have been detected in feces from animals with or without diarrhea (Bhattacharya et al, 2006(Bhattacharya et al, , 2007Gatti et al, 1989).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Since its discovery in 1988, PBV has been detected in faecal specimens of numerous domestic and captive animal species such as rats (Pereira et al, 1988b;Fregolente et al, 2009), chickens (Alfieri et al, 1989;Leite et al, 1990;Monteiro et al, 1991;Tamehiro et al, 2003;Fregolente et al, 2009;Ribeiro et al, 2014), hamsters (Pereira et al, 1988b), guinea pigs , pigs (Gatti et al, 1989;Chasey et al, 1990;Ludert et al, 1991;Pongsuwanna et al, 1996;Carruyo et al, 2008;Banyai et al, 2008;Martinez et al, 2010;Smits et al, 2011;Ganesh et al, 2012), dogs (Fregolente et al, 2009;Costa et al, 2004), giant anteaters (Haga et al, 1999), equine (Ganesh et al, 2011), foals (Browning et al, 1991), bovine calves (Buzinaro et al, 2003;Ghosh et al, 2009;Takiuchi et al, 2016), water buffalo calf (Malik et al, 2013), camels (Woo et al, 2014), snake (Fregolente et al, 2009), and several cat family members. It is noteworthy that PBV is not yet established as an etiological agent of diarrhea in animals .…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…During the early stages of life, the virus is detectable by RT-PCR only but at later stages; it is also detectable by RNA-PAGE. Epidemiological studies across the world in different animal species deploying various diagnostic techniques indicate presence of PBVs up to 65 % in porcine (Bányai et al, 2008), 3.7 % in bovines , 14.3 % in equines (Ganesh et al, 2011), 1.8 % in canines (Costa et al, 2004), 49.4 % in chickens (Ribeiro et al, 2014), and 47 % in other animals (Fregolente et al, 2009). The virus is also detected in sewage and surface water with a high frequency potentiating its putative zoonotic potential with emerging and/ or re-emerging threat to a number of animals in different geographical locations.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%