2016
DOI: 10.1007/s40858-016-0065-9
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Current status and management of coffee leaf rust in Brazil

Abstract: In Brazil, coffee leaf rust, a fungal disease caused by Hemileia vastatrix Berk. et Br., was first detected in Coffea arabica in January 1970, in the southern region of Bahia state. Today, the disease is present in virtually all arabica and conilon (Coffea canephora) coffee-growing areas of Brazil, and continues to threaten coffee production with losses that range from 30 to 50 %. The disease is usually less severe at elevations above 1,200 m, where the environment is less conducive for the rust. Disease risk … Show more

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Cited by 147 publications
(173 citation statements)
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References 25 publications
(34 reference statements)
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“…From the first epidemic report in Sri Lanka in 1869, Hv has spread to virtually every coffee‐growing region in the world in about one and a half centuries (McCook and Vandermeer, ; Talhinhas et al ., ). During this period, several major outbreaks have been registered in Asia and Africa and, more recently, since 2008, a cluster of outbreaks has been occurring across the Americas (Avelino et al ., ; McCook and Vandermeer, ; Zambolim, ). Breeding for coffee resistance is considered to be the best long‐term solution to control CLR (McCook and Vandermeer, ), but the introduction of resistant varieties in the field has inevitably resulted in the loss of resistance as a result of adaptation of the pathogen.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…From the first epidemic report in Sri Lanka in 1869, Hv has spread to virtually every coffee‐growing region in the world in about one and a half centuries (McCook and Vandermeer, ; Talhinhas et al ., ). During this period, several major outbreaks have been registered in Asia and Africa and, more recently, since 2008, a cluster of outbreaks has been occurring across the Americas (Avelino et al ., ; McCook and Vandermeer, ; Zambolim, ). Breeding for coffee resistance is considered to be the best long‐term solution to control CLR (McCook and Vandermeer, ), but the introduction of resistant varieties in the field has inevitably resulted in the loss of resistance as a result of adaptation of the pathogen.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…& Br., and brown eye spot (BYS), caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Cercospora coffeicola Berk. However, weather conditions, phenology and disease incidence should be taken into account during the decision-making process (Zambolim, 2016). Both diseases cause a reduction in leaf area and intense defoliation, which decreases the photosynthetic capacity of the plant, compromising the yield of the subsequent year (Zambolim, Vale, & Zambolim, 2005).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It has been estimated that in severe incidence level, the yield reduced from 30% to 80% in the case of arabica coffee. Although chemical control of CLR disease by using different fungicides was largely practised in plantation, the use of rust‐tolerant coffee genotype was considered to be the most promising alternative (Várzea & Marques, ; Zambolim, ). In India, coffee breeding aimed for rust resistance has been taken up and continued for the last 80 years, and as a result, many resistant cultivars have been released for commercial cultivation.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%