2009
DOI: 10.1002/ffj.1927
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Cross‐adaptation of a model human stress‐related odour with fragrance chemicals and ethyl esters of axillary odorants: gender‐specific effects

Abstract: ABSTRACT:The human axillae have a characteristic odour that is comprised of or generated from a mixture of C 6 -C 11 normal, branched, hydroxy-and unsaturated acids (and other compounds). We used ethyl esters of one of these acids and a palette of fragrance compounds (tested individually) to evaluate the effectiveness of these chemicals to reduce the overall olfactory impact of a model of human stress-related odour (SRO) by cross-adaptation (adaptation to one odorant can reduce sensitivity to other odorants). … Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(15 citation statements)
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References 39 publications
(68 reference statements)
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“…Both qualitative and quantitative differences were observed among the males and females studied. Various types of compounds were extracted from males and females for odor detection, sinus, axillary, sweat fluids, including a variety of aldehydes, organic fatty acids, ketones and alkanes, which agrees with aging- Haze et al (2001); sweat- (Ostrovskaya et al 2002), human odor (Martin et al 2005), human axilla- Wysocki et al (2009) and nasal fluid Preti and Leyden (2010) analyzed volatile components using GC-MS.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Both qualitative and quantitative differences were observed among the males and females studied. Various types of compounds were extracted from males and females for odor detection, sinus, axillary, sweat fluids, including a variety of aldehydes, organic fatty acids, ketones and alkanes, which agrees with aging- Haze et al (2001); sweat- (Ostrovskaya et al 2002), human odor (Martin et al 2005), human axilla- Wysocki et al (2009) and nasal fluid Preti and Leyden (2010) analyzed volatile components using GC-MS.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…in explaining the interactions between the human body or skin and EO components in fragrances. [24] A rather new and promising fi eld of application is the use as feed additives in farm animals to substitute 'in-feed antibiotics' , which have been banned in the EU since the beginning of 2006. [25,26] Due to their characteristics, the functions and eff ects of EOs are claimed to improve feed characteristics, the digestion and performance of the animals and the characteristics of animal products.…”
Section: Eff Ect and Effi Cacy: New Fields Of Applicationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…200 Subjects provided hedonic and intensity ratings of the SRO and of each of the potential cross-adapting agents prior to 2.5 min of induced olfactory adaptation to each agent. During adaptation, possible cross-adaptation was evaluated by intermittent ratings of the perceived intensity of the SRO.…”
Section: Reproductive State and Olfactory Sensitivitymentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The effective chemicals depended upon the gender of the donor of the SRO and the gender of the subject, suggesting a gender-specific response to both the SRO stimuli used and the fragrance chemicals used to cross-adapt them. 200 Genderspecific effects have also been documented in the importance of smell for human mate selection, in that women, but not men, ranked body odour as more important for attraction than 'looks' or any social factor except 'pleasantness'. 201 …”
Section: Reproductive State and Olfactory Sensitivitymentioning
confidence: 99%