2014
DOI: 10.7705/biomedica.v34i2.2133
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Conocimientos y factores de riesgo relacionados con la enfermedad de Chagas en dos comunidades panameñas donde Rhodnius pallescens es el vector principal

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Cited by 18 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…Herein, insects were found in the three ecotopes and most specimens (both nymphs and adults) were collected in sylvatic habitats mainly in wine ( A. butyracea ) and oil ( Elaeis guineensis ) palm trees, while 21.6% (adults) were collected in domestic habitats. This is consistent with previous studies in Colombia [27, 57, 58, 60, 61] and Panama [40, 58, 6265], where the percentage of T. cruzi infection is similar to our results. Moreover, it was observed that the main feeding source was human blood across the three ecotopes.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
“…Herein, insects were found in the three ecotopes and most specimens (both nymphs and adults) were collected in sylvatic habitats mainly in wine ( A. butyracea ) and oil ( Elaeis guineensis ) palm trees, while 21.6% (adults) were collected in domestic habitats. This is consistent with previous studies in Colombia [27, 57, 58, 60, 61] and Panama [40, 58, 6265], where the percentage of T. cruzi infection is similar to our results. Moreover, it was observed that the main feeding source was human blood across the three ecotopes.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 94%
“…Another triatomine species with a very high prevalence was R. pallescens with geographical predominance in the north-west part of the country (Caribbean region). This vector has been also associated with Attalea butyracea palms [63, 6687], has been reported frequently in Costa Rica and Nicaragua [67] and it is considered the main vector in Panama [68, 69]. Importantly, this species has been found commonly circulating in areas of oral outbreaks in Colombia [37].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…La extensión del área endémica, la variedad de vectores con comportamientos diversos y las múltiples variables que intervienen y determinan diferentes patrones de transmisión, revelan la necesidad imperiosa de adoptar un manejo del riesgo y del control vectorial específicos en cada zona (14)(15)(16).…”
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