2006
DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2005.09.002
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Comparison of the role of the sea club-rush Scirpus maritimus and the sea rush Juncus maritimus in terms of concentration, speciation and bioaccumulation of metals in the estuarine sediment

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Cited by 83 publications
(35 citation statements)
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“…accumulated greater concentrations of metals than shoots, indicating the bioavailability of metals and their limited mobility and translocation once inside the plant. This is consistent with many previous observations (Almeida et al 2011(Almeida et al , 2006Chandra et al 2008;Maddison et al 2005;Deng et al 2004;Mays and Edwards 2001;Sasmaz et al 2008). For example, the results from Sasmaz et al (2008) showed that the root tissues of Typha latifolia from a metal polluted stream were usually found to contain higher concentrations of most metals compared to the aboveground parts.…”
Section: Metal Accumulation By Plantssupporting
confidence: 92%
“…accumulated greater concentrations of metals than shoots, indicating the bioavailability of metals and their limited mobility and translocation once inside the plant. This is consistent with many previous observations (Almeida et al 2011(Almeida et al , 2006Chandra et al 2008;Maddison et al 2005;Deng et al 2004;Mays and Edwards 2001;Sasmaz et al 2008). For example, the results from Sasmaz et al (2008) showed that the root tissues of Typha latifolia from a metal polluted stream were usually found to contain higher concentrations of most metals compared to the aboveground parts.…”
Section: Metal Accumulation By Plantssupporting
confidence: 92%
“…Various studies have pointed out that plants can favor the accumulation of metals in the sediment in contact with its roots through several mechanisms (Madureira et al, 1997;Almeida et al, 2006). Moreover, root activity is able to modify characteristics such as Eh, pH and microbial activity, which eventually modifies metal retention capacity (Williams et al, 1994;Almeida et al, 2004).…”
Section: Metal Distribution In the Sedimentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Vascular plants in salt marshes are crucial to the dynamics of the estuarine ecosystem and strongly influence processes of heavy metal accumulation (Alberts et al, 1990;Weis et al, 2002;Windham et al, 2003). Several studies have pointed out that plants can alter the chemistry of the sediment in contact with their roots (rhizosediment) (Madureira et al, 1997;Almeida et al, 2006). In this way, plant activity can influence metal mobility, depending on the existing physicochemical properties in the salt marsh sediment (Jacob & Otte, 2003).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This has been documented for species such as Phragmites australis (Bragato et al 2006), Bolboschoenus maritimus (Almeida et al 2006;Bragato et al 2006;Madejón et al 2006a), and Spartina alterniflora ) that can accumulate and store metals in their roots.…”
mentioning
confidence: 90%
“…maritimus is widely used in the reconstruction, creation and rehabilitation of wetlands (Kantrud 1996) and as test species in pollution-related studies in various countries around the world (Otte et al 1991;Clevering 1995;Almeida et al 2006;Madejón et al 2006a). However, no such studies have been done in South Africa, even though the plant is commonly found on riverbanks around the Cape Peninsula and northwards (Trinder-Smith 2003).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%