2011
DOI: 10.1007/s10750-011-0706-4
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The role of two Spartina species in phytostabilization and bioaccumulation of Co, Cr, and Ni in the Tinto–Odiel estuary (SW Spain)

Abstract: Vascular plants in salt marshes strongly influence processes of heavy metal accumulation. Many studies have focused on this issue; however, there is a lack of information regarding the effects of plants on the distribution of certain poorly studied metals, such as Co, Cr, and Ni. The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the capability of Spartina densiflora Brongn. and Spartina maritima (Curtis) Fernald, to accumulate Co, Cr, and Ni and influence the sediment composition around their roots, investig… Show more

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Cited by 29 publications
(3 citation statements)
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“…With respect to TF, it was below the unit for all elements in all sites, except for Fe in site 5sa (Table 8). This pattern suggests an avoidance of metal translocation, keeping the metals in roots and surrounding sediments, accordingly to previous studies performed in different Spartina species (Windham et al 2003;Duarte et al 2009;Cambrollé et al 2011;Almeida et al 2011). Possible physiological mechanisms responsible for restricted uptake and translocation within plants include cell wall immobilization, complexation with substances such as phytochelatins, and barriers at the root endodermis (Vale et al 1990;Clements et al 2002;Mucha et al 2005;Anjum et al 2013).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 82%
“…With respect to TF, it was below the unit for all elements in all sites, except for Fe in site 5sa (Table 8). This pattern suggests an avoidance of metal translocation, keeping the metals in roots and surrounding sediments, accordingly to previous studies performed in different Spartina species (Windham et al 2003;Duarte et al 2009;Cambrollé et al 2011;Almeida et al 2011). Possible physiological mechanisms responsible for restricted uptake and translocation within plants include cell wall immobilization, complexation with substances such as phytochelatins, and barriers at the root endodermis (Vale et al 1990;Clements et al 2002;Mucha et al 2005;Anjum et al 2013).…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 82%
“…These have either reported the effects of metal toxicity on Spartina alterniflora in greenhouse studies (Mendelssohn et al 2001, Mateos-Naranjo et al 2008 or have examined metal accumulation in the field at polluted sites (Cambrollé et al 2011, Salla et al 2011. Across these studies, S. alterniflora was highly tolerant of soil metal contamination, able to hyperaccumulate metals, and capable of phytoremediation (Salla et al 2011).…”
Section: Foliar Metal Concentrationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Both species of Spartina showed good phytostabilization capacity towards Co in the contaminated soil. 74 Varun et al reported the phytostabilization potential of Typhalatifolia L. in industrial sludge. Their ndings showed that Typhalatifolia L. had higher potential for immobilization of Zn, Mn, Cr and As but had less phytostabilisation potential towards Ni, Cd and Co. 75 Recently, the phytostabilization capacity of six different plant species was assessed for the immobilization of the lead in mine tailing using eld and pot experiments.…”
Section: Phytostabilizationmentioning
confidence: 99%