2000
DOI: 10.1007/bf02344779
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Collagen-based biomaterials as 3D scaffold for cell cultures: applications for tissue engineering and gene therapy

Abstract: Many substances are used in the production of biomaterials: metals (titanium), ceramics (alumina), synthetic polymers (polyurethanes, silicones, polyglycolic acid (PGA), polylactic acid (PLA), copolymers of lactic and glycolic acids (PLGA), polyanhydrides, polyorthoesters) and natural polymers (chitosan, glycosaminoglycans, collagen). With the rapid development in tissue engineering, these different biomaterials have been used as three-dimensional scaffolds and cell transplant devices. The principal biochemica… Show more

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Cited by 331 publications
(197 citation statements)
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References 76 publications
(57 reference statements)
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“…Roeder et al showed, in agreement with the conclusions from Wood et al, that the fibril diameter decreases and the fibril length increases by increasing the pH, conjecturing that this change could explain the improvement in the mechanical properties [21,23]. While the mechanical properties increased as expected by increasing collagen concentration, collagen gels prepared at 2 mg/mL and different pH (6)(7)(8)(9) were stiffer at higher pH. The values of the linear modulus reported by these authors are lower than those presented in this work most probably for three reasons: a lower concentration of collagen in the gels, a lower pH during gel preparation and a lower testing rate.…”
Section: (Kpa)supporting
confidence: 68%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Roeder et al showed, in agreement with the conclusions from Wood et al, that the fibril diameter decreases and the fibril length increases by increasing the pH, conjecturing that this change could explain the improvement in the mechanical properties [21,23]. While the mechanical properties increased as expected by increasing collagen concentration, collagen gels prepared at 2 mg/mL and different pH (6)(7)(8)(9) were stiffer at higher pH. The values of the linear modulus reported by these authors are lower than those presented in this work most probably for three reasons: a lower concentration of collagen in the gels, a lower pH during gel preparation and a lower testing rate.…”
Section: (Kpa)supporting
confidence: 68%
“…Scaffold-based vascular tissue engineering (VTE) proposes to combine cells and scaffolding systems in order to obtain vascular constructs [4]. Concerning the choice of the material for the scaffolds, collagen in particular is of significant interest because of its biological properties [6,7].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the material containing the cells must have sufficient flexibility for repetitive compressive stimulation. Collagen is a major component of extracellular matrix and is used as an in vitro organization model (Chevallay and Herbage 2000;Fox et al 2006;Stone et al 1992Stone et al , 1997Vernon and Gooden 2002). Contracted collagen gels (spheroids), in particular, are flexible under mechanical stress.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Such tunability or matrix remodeling has been implicated in diverse aspects of physiology including control of interstitial fluid pressure [2], aging [3], repair [4][5][6], fibrosis [7,8] and tumorigenesis [9]. Not surprisingly, matrix remodeling also is an important consideration for tissue engineering [10][11][12][13][14][15][16].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%