2019
DOI: 10.1007/s12187-018-9608-6
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Child Poverty Amongst Young Carers in the UK: Prevalence and Trends in the Wake of the Financial Crisis, Economic Downturn and Onset of Austerity

Abstract: The article provides the first estimates of prevalence and trends in child poverty amongst young carers aged 5-19 in the UK using specialized income data from the Family Resources Survey / the Households Below Average Income Survey. Looking across four key indicators, we find that child poverty rates were higher amongst young carers than other children based on 3 years pooled data for 2013/14-2015/16. The differences in the prevalence of child poverty amongst young carers and other children are statistically s… Show more

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Cited by 19 publications
(20 citation statements)
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“…Understanding Society avoids some of the difficulties by asking the young people themselves about care provision and by avoiding the term 'carer' (instead using phrases such as 'look after or give special help to'). Nonetheless, our sample selection may have missed some young adult carers, and the prevalence we use may therefore be an underestimate, particularly because the question does not specify giving help to someone with mental illhealth or drug or alcohol dependency, and these are needs that are supported by young carers more than other carers [56]. Another potential issue may be the degree of fluidity in caring responsibilities seen in both this dataset and for carers more generally.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Understanding Society avoids some of the difficulties by asking the young people themselves about care provision and by avoiding the term 'carer' (instead using phrases such as 'look after or give special help to'). Nonetheless, our sample selection may have missed some young adult carers, and the prevalence we use may therefore be an underestimate, particularly because the question does not specify giving help to someone with mental illhealth or drug or alcohol dependency, and these are needs that are supported by young carers more than other carers [56]. Another potential issue may be the degree of fluidity in caring responsibilities seen in both this dataset and for carers more generally.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The census counted 149,929 children as young carers in England and Wales, equating to 2.1% of young people aged five to 17 years old as young carers (ONS, 2013). Other studies, including those that ask children to report on their involvement in unpaid care, rather than relying an adult in the family to respond on their behalf, find higher prevalence, for example 4.5% of children (Vizard et al, 2019). The research indicates that young carers are there in significant numbers and that there is a strong case for providing them with support services.…”
Section: Young Carers In Englandmentioning
confidence: 85%
“…There is a lack of studies that examine the experience of young carers in relation to class and 'race' (Aldridge, 2018;Jones et al, 2002). Some recent studies have explored the subject of young carers and poverty (Vizard et al, 2019) or as LGBTQ + young adults (Traynor, 2016). Research into what categories of social difference, such as age and disability, mean for young carers has been added to the debate about how to understand children's relationships to care.…”
Section: Young Carers In Englandmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Those from the lowest income groups are less likely to have discussed the choices with their parents compared with those from higher income groups and may therefore be in the greatest need of access to guidance counsellors. These findings can also be interrelated to the young carer experience where they commonly originate from a poorer socio-economic background ( Hill et al, 2011 ) and where child poverty is higher amongst young carers than other children ( Vizard et al, 2019 ). Young carers themselves may not wish to discuss their own future needs out of fear or guilt of having to leave the family home and the person they care for.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While a proportion of research on carers highlights the benefits and skillset gained through caring such as greater maturity and compassion ( Fives et al ., 2010 ), along with healthcare and advocacy skills ( Aldridge, 2014 ; Killam et al, 2016 ), the majority of research on young carers in school highlight the stresses and challenges experienced when combining caring with formal education needs ( Becker & Sempik, 2019 ). Recent research reveals specific issues that affect young carers in school include; falling asleep in class, truanting, lack of concentration, falling behind in work ( Vizard et al ., 2019 ), and poor school attendance and achievement ( Wong, 2016 ). The type of care delivered and the nature of the family members’ illness who the young carer supports, are proven to be significant indicators of the level of school engagement.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%