2018
DOI: 10.3390/su10051598
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Challenges and Action Points to Amplify Agroecology in Europe

Abstract: Agriculture in Europe results in the production of food for both the European population and for the export sector. Significant environmental and social problems have emerged with the intensification of European agriculture. These include the loss of biodiversity, the contamination of soils, water, and food with pesticides, and the eutrophication of water bodies. Industrialized agricultural and food systems are also a major contributing factor in the decline of farm numbers, and the high use of antibiotics has… Show more

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Cited by 55 publications
(31 citation statements)
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“…Increasing biological diversity, for example, through species mixtures, crop rotation, mixed crop-livestock systems or agroforestry, is therefore widely acknowledged as crucial in order to take advantage of ecosystem functions and services in the agricultural system while creating resilience and resource self-sufficiency (Hill and MacRae 1996;Wezel et al 2014). The need for change toward more agroecological farming systems is acknowledged at international (FAO 2018), European (Wezel et al 2018) and national levels (Gonzalez, Thomas, and Chang 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Increasing biological diversity, for example, through species mixtures, crop rotation, mixed crop-livestock systems or agroforestry, is therefore widely acknowledged as crucial in order to take advantage of ecosystem functions and services in the agricultural system while creating resilience and resource self-sufficiency (Hill and MacRae 1996;Wezel et al 2014). The need for change toward more agroecological farming systems is acknowledged at international (FAO 2018), European (Wezel et al 2018) and national levels (Gonzalez, Thomas, and Chang 2018).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Sustainable practices involve reducing the use of inputs that are potentially harmful to the environment, or a shift towards more locally available resources, while maintaining the competitiveness and economic viability of agriculture (Committee on World Food Security (CFS) 2014; Wezel et al 2018). These practices have several benefits, such as reducing labor costs and energy consumption, conserving soil moisture and minimizing erosion, decreasing pests and diseases, improving soil fertility, and preventing excessive humidity.…”
Section: Transition To Sustainable Agriculturementioning
confidence: 99%
“…With this in mind, it becomes clear how long-term experiments could be crucial in implementing 'participation in' and 'appropriation of' the research over a long term [14]. Participatory action research (PAR) and its methodological approach can then be used to collaborate with local communities, to directly contribute to redirect current agrifood systems toward sustainability, responding to research questions of farmers and other actors of the territory, as well as guaranteeing greater autonomy and self-management [15][16][17]. In recent years, several studies investigated how to implement PAR at the local and European level as a tool to incentivize community-led local development strategies [3,17,18].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%