2008
DOI: 10.1590/s0103-84782008000200041
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Abstract: During a survey for ectoparasites on birds in a small reserve of the Brazilian cerrado (savannah) a male adultRhipicephalus sanguineus tick was found attached to the eyelid of the bird Coereba flaveola. Both tick and bird are presently common in Brazil, however, to best of our knowledge, the association of this tick species with this bird species has not been reported before. This observation may be an accidental finding but might also be an unknown route for the dissemination of the tick. The species R. sangu… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(12 citation statements)
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“…Of these, it was possible to identify 31 larvae and 27 nymphs of Amblyomma longirostre (Koch, 1844), 17 nymphs of A. nodosum (Neumann, 1899), one A. cajennense (Fabricius, 1787) larva, and one male Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) ( Table 1). This R. sanguineus specimen was previously reported elsewhere (SZABÓ et al, 2008). All other ticks were identified as Amblyomma sp.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 55%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Of these, it was possible to identify 31 larvae and 27 nymphs of Amblyomma longirostre (Koch, 1844), 17 nymphs of A. nodosum (Neumann, 1899), one A. cajennense (Fabricius, 1787) larva, and one male Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) ( Table 1). This R. sanguineus specimen was previously reported elsewhere (SZABÓ et al, 2008). All other ticks were identified as Amblyomma sp.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
confidence: 55%
“…This is a relevant finding since A. cajennense is a major known vector of Rocky Mountain spotted fever agent, Rickettsia rickettsii (LABRUNA, 2009), in Brazil and is the host-seeking tick significantly captured in the cerrado biome (SZABÓ et al, 2007;VERONEZ et al, 2010). At the same time the finding of an adult R. sanguineus, a dog tick, on C. flaveola was unexpected, probably accidental, but it warrants future awareness (SZABÓ et al, 2008) as this species is of paramount importance due to its ability to transmit major pathogenic agents, such Ehrliquia canis, to its hosts (MACHADO, 2004).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…At the same time it has been described previously from dogs only once in Brazil (SABATINI et al, 2010). Birds may actually deliver ticks the other way round, picking them up in rural/urban areas (SZABÓ et al, 2008). This linking ability of birds is possibly encouraged by human activities such as, in the case reported here, the owner's bird feeding habit, which is very common human behavior.…”
Section: Introductionsupporting
confidence: 64%
“…Despite such avian diversity, only 3 tick species are known in Brazil to use birds as primary hosts for all parasitic stages: Argas miniatus Koch, 1844, a parasite of domestic fowl, and Ixodes auritulus Neumann, 1904 and Ixodes paranaensis BarrosBattesti, Arzua, Pichorim & Keirans, 2003, parasites of wild birds (Arzua et al 1994, Arzua & Barros-Battesti 1999, Dantas-Torres et al 2009). Curiously, accidental infestations by Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille, 1806) have been reported on native and nonnative birds in Brazil (Diogo et al 2003, Szabó et al 2008. For the most part, however, studies have reported the occurrence of immature stages (larvae and nymphs) of Amblyomma spp.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%