2012
DOI: 10.1590/s1984-29612012005000006
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Amblyomma nodosum (Acari: Ixodidae) parasitizing a domestic dog in Colatina, Espírito Santo, Brazil

Abstract: On 27 Jan 2011 an adult Amblyomma nodosum tick was found attached to a domestic dog from the municipality of Colatina, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil. This is the first report of this tick species in this state and the second time it has been reported parasitizing a domestic dog in the country. For the time being, this finding should be regarded as incidental. However, more in-depth research into the hosts and ecology of A. nodosum is needed, since it has been associated to infectious agents that are potentia… Show more

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Cited by 7 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…Our report extends the distribution of this tick species into Ceará , northeastern Brazil, and within the Caatinga biome, mature stages of A. nodosum parasitized T. tetradactyla, which is consistent with previous studies (Barros-Battestti et al 2006). There is no record of human infestation by A. nodosum (Guglielmone et al 2014), but it has been previously reported parasitizing a dog (Canis familiaris; Mazioli et al 2012). Our results may indicate the possibility for epidemic and enzootic cycles of rickettsiae.…”
supporting
confidence: 45%
“…Our report extends the distribution of this tick species into Ceará , northeastern Brazil, and within the Caatinga biome, mature stages of A. nodosum parasitized T. tetradactyla, which is consistent with previous studies (Barros-Battestti et al 2006). There is no record of human infestation by A. nodosum (Guglielmone et al 2014), but it has been previously reported parasitizing a dog (Canis familiaris; Mazioli et al 2012). Our results may indicate the possibility for epidemic and enzootic cycles of rickettsiae.…”
supporting
confidence: 45%
“…The host species for this stage appear to be restricted to those within the superorder Xenarthra, particularly Myrmecophagidae (JONES et al, 1972;BECHARA et al, 2002;MARTINS et al, 2004MARTINS et al, , 2014GARCIA et al, 2013). Occasional records of hosts such as the six-banded armadillo Euphractus sexcinctus (Linnaeus, 1758) (BECHARA et al, 2002) and dogs can be considered accidental (MAZIOLI et al, 2012). Nava & Guglielmone (2013) consider that ticks do not generally show high host specificity, and that ecological factors such as habitat specificity, time elapsed between generations, the free-living stage, and the type of cycle are more important than host selectivity.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%