2018
DOI: 10.1242/jeb.188763
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Bone without minerals and its secondary mineralization in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): the recovery from phosphorus deficiency

Abstract: Calcium and phosphorus (P) are the main bone minerals, and P deficiency can cause hypomineralized bones (osteomalacia) and malformations. This study used a P-deficient salmon model to falsify three hypotheses. First, an extended period of dietary P deficiency does not cause pathologies other than osteomalacia. Second, secondary mineralization of non-mineralized bone is possible. Third, secondary mineralization can restore the bones' mineral composition and mechanical properties. For 7 weeks, post-smolt Atlanti… Show more

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Cited by 24 publications
(40 citation statements)
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References 75 publications
(88 reference statements)
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“…P nutrition in S. salar is important during all life stages for bone mineralization (Fjelldal et al ., 2009; Fjelldal, Hansen, & Albrektsen, 2012; Fraser et al ., 2019). If P supply is too low, osteoid deposition is normal, while the incorporation of minerals is hampered (Witten et al ., 2019). As P crystalizes with calcium during mineralization, it cannot be replaced with other minerals in the process of bone mineralization.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…P nutrition in S. salar is important during all life stages for bone mineralization (Fjelldal et al ., 2009; Fjelldal, Hansen, & Albrektsen, 2012; Fraser et al ., 2019). If P supply is too low, osteoid deposition is normal, while the incorporation of minerals is hampered (Witten et al ., 2019). As P crystalizes with calcium during mineralization, it cannot be replaced with other minerals in the process of bone mineralization.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…For example, ectopic mineralization was shown surrounding the eye, in the wall of the bulbus arteriosus of the heart and in the ventral skin of the dragon fish (dgf −/− ), a knock-out zebrafish model for the gene that encodes Enpp1, and modeled for generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI) and pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) (105,106). Bone collagen in teleosts can also be deposited without being mineralized, as was shown in salmon vertebral bone (246,247) and in the dentine of replacement teeth of the African bichir (248). It is important to underline that the unmineralized collagen cannot be visualized with ARS, however, mineralization usually quickly follows collagen deposition.…”
Section: Alizarin Red Smentioning
confidence: 96%
“…However, this role seems less critical in teleosts than in terrestrial vertebrates since, as aquatic animals, teleosts can mobilise calcium and other elements directly from the ambient water via their gills and/or digestive system (Takagi & Yamada, ; Witten & Huysseune, ; Shahar & Dean, ). Phosphorus availability appears to be more critical than that of calcium for healthy growth in both marine and freshwater teleosts (Witten & Huysseune, ; Shahar & Dean, ), and bone does not seem to mineralise when phosphorus is absent from the diet (Witten et al , , ). Nevertheless, a specific type of bone resorption (osteocytic osteolysis) is undertaken by the osteocytes themselves and may be linked to periods of increased metabolic calcium and/or phosphorus requirement, as it occurs conspicuously in certain diadromous teleost species [e.g.…”
Section: Teleost Acellular Bone: Structure and Functionmentioning
confidence: 99%