2019
DOI: 10.1111/brv.12505
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

The phylogenetic origin and evolution of acellular bone in teleost fishes: insights into osteocyte function in bone metabolism

Abstract: Vertebrate bone is composed of three main cell types: osteoblasts, osteoclasts and osteocytes, the latter being by far the most numerous. Osteocytes are thought to play a fundamental role in bone physiology and homeostasis, however they are entirely absent in most extant species of teleosts, a group that comprises the vast majority of bony 'fishes', and approximately half of vertebrates. Understanding how this acellular (anosteocytic) bone appeared and was maintained in such an important vertebrate group has i… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

0
47
0

Year Published

2019
2019
2024
2024

Publication Types

Select...
7
1

Relationship

1
7

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 38 publications
(47 citation statements)
references
References 152 publications
0
47
0
Order By: Relevance
“…A recent evolutionary analysis suggested that aspidin was the ancestral bone type, with cellular bone evolving from it at least two times in vertebrate evolution (Keating et al 2018). Cellular bone first evolved in osteostracans, and its presence in placoderms, acanthodians, and osteichthyans suggests that cellular bone is a synapomorphy of gnathostomes and osteostracans (Brazeau and Friedman 2014;Davesne et al 2019). Because a healing mechanism is found in both aspidin and cellular bone, and cellular bone evolved from aspidin, it is most parsimonious that the healing mechanism evolved in early vertebrate bone (regardless of its cellularity).…”
Section: Phylogenetic Synthesismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A recent evolutionary analysis suggested that aspidin was the ancestral bone type, with cellular bone evolving from it at least two times in vertebrate evolution (Keating et al 2018). Cellular bone first evolved in osteostracans, and its presence in placoderms, acanthodians, and osteichthyans suggests that cellular bone is a synapomorphy of gnathostomes and osteostracans (Brazeau and Friedman 2014;Davesne et al 2019). Because a healing mechanism is found in both aspidin and cellular bone, and cellular bone evolved from aspidin, it is most parsimonious that the healing mechanism evolved in early vertebrate bone (regardless of its cellularity).…”
Section: Phylogenetic Synthesismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The clade Euteleostei includes approximately two‐thirds of teleost diversity (Nelson, Grande, & Wilson, 2016), yet is only represented by salmoniforms in our sample. This is because most euteleosts show ‘acellular’ (or anosteocytic) bone that is entirely devoid of osteocytes (Davesne, Meunier, Friedman, Benson, & Otero, 2018; Davesne et al, 2019; Kölliker, 1859; Meunier, 1989; Moss, 1961; Parenti, 1986; Shahar & Dean, 2013). Salmoniforms are one of the few exceptions, and may have re‐acquired osteocytes secondarily during their early evolution (Davesne et al, 2019).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Characterizing the variation in osteocyte morphology is fundamental to constraining hypotheses about its biological causes, and can therefore provide insights into the multiple functions of osteocytes in living bone, which are currently not entirely understood in ray‐finned fishes (Currey, Dean, & Shahar, 2017; Davesne et al, 2019; Doherty, Ghalambor, & Donahue, 2015; Shahar & Dean, 2013). There are many accounts of variation in osteocyte morphology at different scales, mostly within various vertebrate lineages other than actinopterygians: (a) within a single bone (e.g.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…All these virtual techniques are based on the 3D characterization of the object (e.g., skull, mandibles, or any other skeletal part preserved as a fossil or footprints and burrow casts) subject to analysis (Knaust, 2012;Kouraiss et al, 2019). This could be also done to digitize solely the external surface of the object (e.g., using laser scanning, modulated-light, structurelight surface scanning or photogrammetry) or to digitize both the external surface as well as the internal structures with XCT (Kouraiss et al, 2019) or synchrotron microtomography (SRµCT) (Sanchez et al, 2012;Davesne et al, 2019;Honkanen et al, 2020). Depending on the type of the object and the aim of the study, the resolution required will be different, and therefore, one type of tomography will be used.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%