1979
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.115.2.170
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Abstract: Seven patients with blastomycosis-like pyoderma had skin lesions of four months' to six years' duration. The criteria for the diagnosis of blastomycosis-like pyoderma include the clinical presentation of large verrucous plaques with multiple pustules and elevated border, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with abscess histologically, and the growth of at least one pathogenic bacteria from the culture of a tissue-biopsy specimen. The differential diagnosis includes deep fungus infection (especially North America… Show more

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Cited by 23 publications
(10 citation statements)
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“…Because the skin lesions usually occur on the trunk and the groin, the remarkably well-defined, vegetating plaques with elevated borders on fingers and toes in our case seemed to be an unusual clinical presentation. The diagnosis of the disease depends on five criteria which were proposed by Su et al [7]: large verrucous plaques with multiple pustules and elevated border, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with abscesses in tissue biopsy, growth of at least one pathogenic bacterium, negative culture for deep fungi, atypical mycobacteria or mycobacterium tuberculosis and normal bromide levels. The main pitfall is the risk of clinically misdiagnosing this rare condition.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Because the skin lesions usually occur on the trunk and the groin, the remarkably well-defined, vegetating plaques with elevated borders on fingers and toes in our case seemed to be an unusual clinical presentation. The diagnosis of the disease depends on five criteria which were proposed by Su et al [7]: large verrucous plaques with multiple pustules and elevated border, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with abscesses in tissue biopsy, growth of at least one pathogenic bacterium, negative culture for deep fungi, atypical mycobacteria or mycobacterium tuberculosis and normal bromide levels. The main pitfall is the risk of clinically misdiagnosing this rare condition.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…HIV infection [10], malignant tumors, i.e. lymphomas [11], leukemia [12], carcinomas [13], alcoholism, nutritional deficit, diabetes mellitus [14], or therapy with immunosuppressive agents [4], and even in other situations such as bowel inflammatory disease [15, 16], and acne conglobata and follicular occlusion triad [17]. Treatment of this condition is usually very difficult.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To differentiate PV from other cutaneous vegetating disorders, Su et al [13] proposed five criteria for the diagnosis of PV: (1) large verrucous plaques with multiple pustules and elevated border, (2) pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia with abscesses in tissue biopsy specimen, (3) growth of at least one pathogenic bacterium, such as S. aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococci, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa , (4) negative cultures for deep fungi, atypical mycobacteria, or Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and (5) normal bromide blood levels.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The disorder is also known as “ blastomycosis-like pyoderma .”[59] It most commonly presents as a verrucous plaque studded with pustules, thus mimicking pyoderma gangrenosum, especially of the vegetans type. When the lesions are localized to the oral mucosa, it is known as “ pyostomatitis vegetans .” Such cases mostly occur in association with IBD.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%