2011
DOI: 10.1186/1743-0003-8-22
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Biomechanical energy harvesting from human motion: theory, state of the art, design guidelines, and future directions

Abstract: BackgroundBiomechanical energy harvesting from human motion presents a promising clean alternative to electrical power supplied by batteries for portable electronic devices and for computerized and motorized prosthetics. We present the theory of energy harvesting from the human body and describe the amount of energy that can be harvested from body heat and from motions of various parts of the body during walking, such as heel strike; ankle, knee, hip, shoulder, and elbow joint motion; and center of mass vertic… Show more

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Cited by 270 publications
(193 citation statements)
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“…the human body or vibrating machinery) is typically much larger than the intended generator, and so the need to attach the harvester to both the moving body and a stationary base, or to two locations moving relative to each other (e.g. upper and lower leg [14]), places severe constraints on both the degree of miniaturisation and on usable locations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…the human body or vibrating machinery) is typically much larger than the intended generator, and so the need to attach the harvester to both the moving body and a stationary base, or to two locations moving relative to each other (e.g. upper and lower leg [14]), places severe constraints on both the degree of miniaturisation and on usable locations.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…However, the small temperature gradients of human body and loss of latent heat through evaporation of sweat limited the total power that could be converted by wearable thermoelectric generators. [2,118] The efficiency of thermoelectric conversion is largely determined by the active materials. Semiconductor materials are promising candidates for TEGs because they have Seebeck coefficients larger than 100 µV °C −1 .…”
Section: Wearable Thermoelectric Generatorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This challenge can be, in principle, overcome by MTS or STS strategy. Typically, mechanical energy (such as heart beats, [116] blood flow, [117] walking, [118] breathing, [119] and stretching of muscles) [120] and body heat are two main energy sources for electricity generation. [120] To date, stretchable electricity generators can be categorized into three types: stretchable piezoelectric generators, stretchable triboelectric generators, and wearable thermoelectric generators.…”
Section: Stretchable Generatorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Another major factor considered in the selection of these motors is the angular speed of motors required to produce a gait similar to human gait. Since the angular velocity for a human joint is, approximately, 20 rpm (Riemer and Shapiro 2011), which is equal to 120 degree per second, these two motors were selected so that they could perform well at this speed.…”
Section: Dimensions Weights and Joints Range Motionsmentioning
confidence: 99%