2017
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0171092
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Abstract: The conservation and sustainable management of Annona coriacea requires knowledge of its floral and reproductive biology, and of its main pollinators and their life cycles. In this work, we analyzed these aspects in detail. Floral biology was assessed by observing flowers from the beginning of anthesis to senescence. The visiting hours and behavior of floral visitors in the floral chamber were recorded, as were the sites of oviposition. Excavations were undertaken around specimens of A. coriacea to determine t… Show more

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Cited by 26 publications
(21 citation statements)
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“…Cyclocephala cribrata Burmeister larvae reportedly eat the roots of bromeliads in Brazil (Luederwaldt 1926). Cyclocephala atricapilla Mannerheim adults and larvae were found beneath litter near their Annona host plants, and the larvae were observed feeding on decaying material (Costa et al 2017). …”
Section: Economic Importance Of Larvae and Adultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Cyclocephala cribrata Burmeister larvae reportedly eat the roots of bromeliads in Brazil (Luederwaldt 1926). Cyclocephala atricapilla Mannerheim adults and larvae were found beneath litter near their Annona host plants, and the larvae were observed feeding on decaying material (Costa et al 2017). …”
Section: Economic Importance Of Larvae and Adultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Cyclocephaline scarab beetles have been observed to mate within the inflorescences or flowers of many families: 1) Nymphaeaceae (Prance and Arias 1975; Hirthe and Porembski 2003); 2) Annonaceae (Gottsberger 1990, Murray 1993, Costa et al 2017); 3) Magnoliaceae (Gibbs et al 1977, Dieringer and Espinosa 1994, Dieringer et al 1999); 4) Cyclanthaceae (Beach 1982); 5) Araceae (Young 1986, 1988a, b, Maia and Schlindwein 2006, Grimm 2009, Seymour et al 2009, Moore 2012); 5) Arecaceae (Beach 1984, Rickson et al 1990, Voeks 2002); 6) Solanaceae (Ratcliffe and Cave 2017); and possibly 7) Cactaceae (B. Schlumpberger in litt . 2011).…”
Section: Cyclocephalines As Floral Visitorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
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