2010
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-35982010000600028
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Abstract: -The experiment evaluated total and individual yield of commercial cuts, bones, and trimmings of carcasses from 38 Braford steers at 22 months of age finished in a feedlot. Carcasses were ranked according to three conformation classes (good minus = score 10; good = score 11; good plus = score 12), and three weight classes (heavy = 229.4 kg, intermediate = 205.0 kg, and light = 184.0 kg, ranging from 222.9 to 250.4, 201.5 to 209.0, and 170.0 to 190.3 kg, respectively). Carcass cold shrinkage was not affected … Show more

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Cited by 13 publications
(18 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(24 reference statements)
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“…These indications were also reported by Ferreira et al (2009) who observed similarity in the conformation of crossbred Charolês x Nelore animals, with superior backfat thickness for cows (6.21 vs 3.83 mm). For Pascoal et al (2010) the conformation indicated the total yield of meat cuts of the carcass contrary to the carcass weight. According to these authors, steer carcasses with better conformation produce a higher total yield of meat cuts, a fact that in the present study was shown by the positive correlation (P>0.05) between conformation and muscle quantity on the carcass (r=0.63).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These indications were also reported by Ferreira et al (2009) who observed similarity in the conformation of crossbred Charolês x Nelore animals, with superior backfat thickness for cows (6.21 vs 3.83 mm). For Pascoal et al (2010) the conformation indicated the total yield of meat cuts of the carcass contrary to the carcass weight. According to these authors, steer carcasses with better conformation produce a higher total yield of meat cuts, a fact that in the present study was shown by the positive correlation (P>0.05) between conformation and muscle quantity on the carcass (r=0.63).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Authors as Pazdiora et al (2013) for example found greater representativeness of the forequarter as the slaughter weight of the animals increased, which might have been a result of the sexual dimorphism of uncastrated animals, where a more accelerated muscle development of the forequarter is observed in comparison with the pistola hindquarter. However, Pascoal et al (2010) found no differences for percentage of forequarter cuts relative to carcass weight in Braford cattle slaughtered with a carcass weight of 184, 205, and 229 kg. Moreover, those authors found mean values of 2.68 % and 4.32% for brisket and rump, respectively, which are much lower figures than those found in the present study.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 71%
“…Ledic, Tonhati & Fernandes (2000), did not find differences in percentage of bone, which averaged 8.02 %. Pascoal et al (2010) found no differences in Braford animals slaughtered at 184, 205, and 229 kg of carcass for edible and discarded trimmings, which accounted for an average 1.30 and 2.45 % of the carcass, respectively.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 74%
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“…Additionally, these animals are less susceptible to weaning stress compared with purebred animals or animals with a predominance of the Nellore (RESTLE et al, 1999a). The ischial opening and rump width in males are essential parameters in the selection of animals, because larger values are related to a larger muscle deposition area (DI MARCO et al, 2007), and these are also the regions of more valuable cuts in the bovine carcass (PASCOAL et al, 2010). Animal breeding programs that study the phenotypic evolution of animals in relation to productivity seek large and deep hindquarters, aiming for a higher percentage of the more valuable meat cuts in the carcass, thereby adding value to the production process (MOURÃO et al, 2010).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%