2015
DOI: 10.1016/j.compedu.2014.08.019
|View full text |Cite|
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Assessing the effects of gamification in the classroom: A longitudinal study on intrinsic motivation, social comparison, satisfaction, effort, and academic performance

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

39
816
14
100

Year Published

2016
2016
2023
2023

Publication Types

Select...
6
3

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 1,204 publications
(969 citation statements)
references
References 27 publications
39
816
14
100
Order By: Relevance
“…Gamification has generally led to positive outcomes [25], but some findings are mixed (e.g., [15]) or even show a negative influence of gamification (e.g., [27]). Failed efforts to gamify, estimated to be as high as 80 percent [20], are often attributed to poor game design [10].…”
Section: Gamificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Gamification has generally led to positive outcomes [25], but some findings are mixed (e.g., [15]) or even show a negative influence of gamification (e.g., [27]). Failed efforts to gamify, estimated to be as high as 80 percent [20], are often attributed to poor game design [10].…”
Section: Gamificationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While some extant research does examine gamification targeted at primary school student users [4,16,19], its focus has not been on motivation. At the same time, empirical work that examines gamification and motivation (such as [1,9,14,17,26,30]) tends to focus on University students, and reports mixed evidence of its success on this user group [43].…”
Section: Gamification In Educationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A number of motivation measures have been used in an attempt to establish the effect of gamification on student motivation with qualitative data primarily used to supplement these quantitative results (e.g. [1,6,9,12,14,17,26,40]). This approach has yielded mixed results, showing that motivation and learning outcomes increase for some students in some settings.…”
Section: Research Aims and Approachmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Among the reasons that have been pointed out for the use of video games in education is that EVGs may be appealing and motivating for the new generations of students that have grown up in the age of video games [8]. It is assumed that the elements that make video games fun along with the nature of games themselves are intrinsically motivating [9] so applying game elements to the classroom may increase students' intrinsic motivation to learn [10]. The use of video games can also improve students' engagement and learning outcomes [11] and can be used to tailor difficulty progression that facilitates scaffolded instruction based on each individual student's needs [10].…”
Section: The Gamification Of Education and Educational Videogames (Evgs)mentioning
confidence: 99%