2020
DOI: 10.1186/s41182-019-0187-0
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Abstract: Snakebite envenomation is a serious public health concern in rural areas of Uganda. Snakebites are poorly documented in Uganda because most occur in rural settings where traditional therapists end up being the first-line defense for treatment. Ethnobotanical surveys in Uganda have reported that some plants are used to antagonize the activity of various snake venoms. This review was sought to identify antivenin plants in Uganda and some pharmacological evidence supporting their use. A literature survey done in … Show more

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Cited by 46 publications
(29 citation statements)
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“…Moreover, plants used against snakebites in Santarém, western Pará, Brazil were validated scientifically against hemorrhagic activity caused by Bothrops jararaca venom [ 52 ]. Ethnobotanical use of antivenin plants used in Uganda were also evidenced by pharmacological analysis [ 53 ]. Neutralization of lethal, enzymatic and hemorrhagic effects of Bothrops atrox venom by medicinal plants from Colombia was documented in a series of studies [ 49 , 54 , 55 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, plants used against snakebites in Santarém, western Pará, Brazil were validated scientifically against hemorrhagic activity caused by Bothrops jararaca venom [ 52 ]. Ethnobotanical use of antivenin plants used in Uganda were also evidenced by pharmacological analysis [ 53 ]. Neutralization of lethal, enzymatic and hemorrhagic effects of Bothrops atrox venom by medicinal plants from Colombia was documented in a series of studies [ 49 , 54 , 55 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…An electronic review of the literature was perfected in two steps: firstly, we searched all the published work (ethnobotanical books, reviews, reports, theses and primary scientific articles) with data on medicinal plants related to the six countries. The search key terms: snakebite, snake envenomation, snake poison, traditional medicine, ethnobotany, alternative medicine, ethnopharmacology, antivenom, antivenin, antiophidic, antitoxin, and snake antidotes were combined with the individual names of the countries [7,104]. Secondly, a search targeted to the use of medicinal plants in antivenom therapy was done.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…With sufficient epidemiological data, the menace was re-included in category A of neglected tropical diseases in June 2017 [6]. In East Africa, there are at least 200 species of snakes reported [7]. Some are harmless or rare; however, the puff adder (Bitis arietans), Gabon viper (Bitis gabonica), green or Jameson's mamba (Dendroaspis jamesoni), black mamba (Dendroaspis polylepis), forest cobra (Naja melanoleuca) and black-necked spitting cobra (Naja naja nigricollis) accounts for most venomous bites in the East African Community [7][8][9][10].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…More than 80% of victims in Bangladesh are handled primarily with the aid of medicinal plants [46]. Medicinal plants are used for the treatment of snake bite in different region of the world [47][48][49][50]. Medicinal plants in this CHTs region are a rich source having anti-venom properties [51] such as Abroma augusta, Achyranthes aspera, Alocasia cucullata, Aristolochia tagala, Calotropis procera, Cassia occidentalis, Ficus hirta, Persicaria chinensis, Senna occidentalis etc.…”
Section: Anti-venommentioning
confidence: 99%